Presidential Proclamations – Mother’s Day

Presidential Proclamations – Mother’s Day

Woodrow Wilson Mother's Day Proclamation

 

Woodrow Wilson Mother’s Day Proclamation May 9, 1914

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

Whereas, By a Joint Resolution approved May 8, 1914, “designating the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day. and for other purposes,” the President is authorized and requested to issue a proclamation calling upon the government officials to display the United States flag on all government buildings, and the people of the United States to display the flag at their homes or other suitable places on the second Sunday in May as a public expression of our love and reverence for the mothers of our country;

And Whereas, By the said Joint Resolution it is made the duty of the President to request the observance of the second Sunday in May as provided for in the said Joint Resolution;

Now, Therefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the said Joint Resolution, do hereby direct the government officials to display the United States flag on all government buildings and do invite the people of the United States to display the flag at their homes or other suitable places on the second Sunday in May as a public expression of our love and reverence for the mothers of our country.

In witness whereof I have set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be hereunto affixed.

Done at the City of Washington this ninth day of May in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and fourteen, and of the Independence of the United States one hundred and thirty-eight.

[signed] WOODROW WILSON

By the President

[signed] William Jennings Bryan

Secretary of State

FDR mother
Franklin D. Roosevelt & mother Sara

Proclamation 2083 – Mother’s Day
May 3, 1934
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas by House Joint Resolution 263, approved and signed by President Wilson on May 8, 1914, the second Sunday in May of each year has been designated as Mother’s Day for the expression of our love and reverence for the mothers of our country; and

Whereas Senate Resolution 218, adopted April 26, 1934, states that “there are throughout our land today an unprecedentedly large number of mothers and dependent children who, because of unemployment or loss of their bread-earners, are lacking many of the necessities of life,” and the President of the United States is therein authorized and requested to issue a proclamation calling for the observance of Mother’s Day this year;

Now, Therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, President of the United States of America, do hereby call upon our citizens to express on Mother’s Day, Sunday, May 13, 1934, our love and reverence for motherhood:

(a) By the customary display of the United States flag on all Government buildings, homes, and other suitable places;

(b) By the usual tokens and messages of affection to our mothers; and

(c) By doing all that we can through our churches, fraternal and welfare agencies for the relief and welfare of mothers and children who may be in need of the necessities of life.

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT

 

Statement on Mother’s Day.
May 7, 1935
On the ninth day of May, 1914, President Wilson, in response to a Joint Resolution of the Congress, issued a proclamation directing Government officials to display the United States flag on all Government buildings and inviting the people of the United States to display the flag at their homes or other suitable places on each second Sunday in May as a public expression of our love and reverence for the mothers of our country.

In the intervening years the observance of Mother’s Day has assumed a deep and growing significance. It is not my purpose this year to issue a special proclamation on the subject as I believe that the attention of the American people will be so devoted to the cause of that day that repeated formal action on the part of the Chief Executive is unnecessary.

I prefer to think that the tributes which will be paid to mothers will come simply and spontaneously from our hearts.

Harry Truman & mother Martha
Harry Truman & mother Martha

Proclamation 2649 – Mother’s Day, 1945
April 17, 1945
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas it is fitting that we acknowledge anew our gratitude, love, and devotion to the mothers of America; and

Whereas in this year of the war’s greatest intensity we are ever mindful of their splendid courage and steadfast loyalty to the highest ideals of our democracy; and

Whereas Congress by joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, set aside the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day, and acclaimed the service rendered the United States by the American mother as “the greatest source of the country’s strength and inspiration”:

Now, Therefore, I, Harry S. Truman, President of the United States of America, do hereby request the observance of Sunday, May 13, 1945, as Mother’s Day, and call upon the officials of the Government to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings, and the people of the Nation to display the flag at their homes or other suitable places, on that day. And I urge that by our prayers, by our devotion to duty, and by evidences of affection, we give expression to our love and reverence for America’s mothers.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States of America to the affixed.

Done at the City of Washington this 17th day of April in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and sixty-ninth.

HARRY S. TRUMAN

By the President:

E.R. STETTINIUS, Jr.
Secretary of State

Proclamation 2689 – Mother’s Day 1946
April 27, 1946
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas it has become customary on one day of each year to unite our hearts in public celebration of the common bond of humanity which we share in the memory and enjoyment of a mother’s love, a mother’s training, and a mother’s care; and

Whereas it is especially appropriate this year after the achievement of victory on a thousand momentous fields of battle that we express the debt of gratitude which each of us owes to his own mother and which we all owe to the mothers of America; and

Whereas by Public Resolution 25, 63d Congress, approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), the second Sunday in May is designated as Mother’s Day, and the President is authorized and requested to issue a proclamation calling for the observance of that day:

Now, Therefore, I, Harry S. Truman, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 12, 1946, be observed as Mother’s Day with Public and private expressions of honor, reverence, and love; and I call upon the officials of the Government to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on that day and the people of the United States to display the flag at their homes or other suitable places as a public expression of honor for the mothers of this country.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington this 27th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and seventieth.

HARRY S. TRUMAN

By the President:

DEAN ACHESON,
Acting Secretary of State.

Proclamation 2727 – Mother’s Day, 1947
April 11, 1947
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas it is a felicitous American custom to turn our thoughts anew to the commemoration of motherhood on one day in each year; and

Whereas, in recognition of that custom, Public Resolution 25, 63d Congress, approved May 8, 1914, provides that the second Sunday in May of each year shall be designated as Mother’s Day, and authorizes and requests the President to issue a proclamation calling for the public observance of that day; and

Whereas, in the eloquent words of the resolution, “the service rendered the United States by the American mother is the greatest source of the country’s strength and inspiration”;

Now, Therefore, I, Harry S. Truman, President of the United States of America, hereby direct the officials of the Government to display the flag on all Government buildings on Mother’s Day, May 11, 1947, and I call upon the people of the United States to display the flag on that day in their homes and other suitable places and to manifest through private and public expressions the reverent esteem in which we hold the mothers of our country.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington this 11th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty-seven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and seventy-first.

HARRY S. TRUMAN

By the President:

DEAN ACHESON,
Acting Secretary of State.

Proclamation 2780 – Mother’s Day, 1948
April 20, 1948
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas American mothers have ever nurtured the ideals which foster and enrich a true democracy; and

Whereas it is a cherished American custom to dedicate one day each year to expressions of affection for our own mothers and for all mothers of the Nation; and

Whereas the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), gave formal recognition to that custom by designating the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day and paid tribute to the contribution made by American mothers to the home and the community:

Now, Therefore, I, Harry S. Truman, President of the United States of America, do hereby request the observance of Sunday, May 9, 1948, as Mother’s Day, and I direct the officials of the Government to display the flag on all Government buildings on that day. I also call upon the people of the United States to give public and private expression to the esteem in which our country holds its mothers through the display of the flag at their homes and other suitable places, through prayers at their places of worship, and through appropriate manifestations of honor, devotion, and love.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington this 20th day of April in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty-eight, and of the Independence of the United states of America the one hundred and seventy-second.

HARRY S. TRUMAN

By the President:

ROBERT A. LOVETT,
Acting Secretary of State.

Proclamation 2836 – Mother’s Day, 1949
April 27, 1949
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas our loftiest national ideals stem in large measure from those high principles which American mothers teach by example and devotion in their daily lives; and

Whereas the Congress, by a Joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), formalized the happy custom of commemorating motherhood on the second Sunday in May of each year; and

Whereas in accordance with the dictates of our hearts we have set that day aside for manifestations of our love and reverence for all mothers of the land:

Now, Therefore, I, Harry S. Truman, President of the United States of America, do hereby request the observance of Sunday, May 8, 1949, as Mother’s Day, and I direct that the flag of the United States be displayed on all Government buildings on that day. I also call upon the people of the Nation to display the flag at their homes or other suitable places on Mother’s Day, 1949, as a public demonstration of the esteem in which we hold our mothers, and I urge that renewed expressions of affection be tendered mothers on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

DONE at the City of Washington this 27th day of April in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty-nine and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and seventy-third.

HARRY S. TRUMAN

By the President:

DEAN ACHESON,
Secretary of State.

Proclamation 2883 – Mother’s Day, 1950
April 19, 1950
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas our mothers are the fountainhead of our spiritual aspirations as individuals and of our humanitarian ideals as Americans; and

Whereas it is appropriate that on one day each year we offer public acknowledgment of the gratitude and love that we feel for our own mothers and of the reverence and respect that we feel for all mothers; and

Whereas in recognition of the fitness of such acknowledgment, the Congress, by joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May of each year as Mother’s Day, and has requested the President to issue a proclamation in commemoration of that day:

Now, Therefore, I, Harry S. Truman, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 14, 1950, be observed as Mother’s Day, and I direct the appropriate officials of the Government to arrange for the display of the flag on all Government buildings on that day. I also call upon the people generally to display the flag at their homes or other suitable places on Sunday, May 14, 1950, as a public expression of our love and reverence for the mothers of our country. Let all the sons and daughters of America pay tribute to their mothers on that day and renew their devotion to the ideals for which motherhood has always stood.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington this 19th day of April in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and seventy-fourth.

HARRY S. TRUMAN

By the President:

DEAN ACHESON,
Secretary of State.

Proclamation 2923 – Mother’s Day, 1951
April 26, 1951
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas the strength of our Nation reflects the strength of the American home, which is based on the virtues fostered by the mothers of our country; and

Whereas, in recognition of the services rendered by American mothers, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), set aside the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day and lauded American mothers for their influence toward good government and their contributions to the moral and religious uplift of humanity:

Now, Therefore, I, Harry S. Truman, President of the United States of America, do hereby direct the appropriate officials of the Government to arrange for the display of the flag of the United States on all public buildings on Mother’s Day, May 13, 1951, and I call upon the people to display the flag on that day at their homes or other suitable places as a public expression of honor for our mothers.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington this 26th day of April in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and seventy-fifth.

HARRY S. TRUMAN

By the President:

DEAN ACHESON,
Secretary of State.

Proclamation 2973 – Mother’s Day, 1952
April 22, 1952
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas, American mothers, who helped to settle our Nation and to blaze pioneer trails across it, have ever stood as symbols of benevolence, virtue, and idealism; and

Whereas, we are wont to set aside a day each year for special expressions of love and reverence for our mothers and of appreciation for the training and care with which they have enriched our lives; and

Whereas, in official acknowledgement of the paramount place that mothers hold in our history as well as in our hearts, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation calling for the celebration of the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day:

Now, Therefore, I, Harry S. Truman, President of the United States of America, do hereby request the observance of Sunday, May 11, 1952, as Mother’s Day, and I call upon the appropriate officials to arrange for the display of the flag of the United States on all Government buildings, and upon the people of the nation to display the flag at their homes or other suitable places, on the appointed day. Let us all on that day, through prayer and through renewed expressions of our love and respect, pay honor to our mothers and to the ideals which they have taught us.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington this 22nd day of April in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and seventy-sixth.

HARRY S. TRUMAN

By the President:

DEAN ACHESON,
Secretary of State.

Dwight D. Eisenhower & mother Ida
Dwight D. Eisenhower & mother Ida

Proclamation 3013 – Mother’s Day 1953
May 1, 1953
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

 

Whereas it is our national custom, hallowed by long observance, to devote one day each year especially to honoring our mothers and expressing our appreciation of their steadfast faith and idealism, which have helped to make our country strong and great; and

Whereas the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, 38 Stat. 770, gave official sanction to this annual observance by designating the second Sunday in May of each year as Mother’s Day, and requesting the President to issue a proclamation calling for the celebration of the day:

Now, Therefore, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 10, 1953, be observed as Mother’s Day; and I direct the appropriate officials of the Government to arrange for the display of the flag of the United States on all public buildings on that day.

I also call upon the people of the Nation generally to give public and private expression to the reverence we all feel for motherhood, through the display of the flag at their homes or other suitable places on the appointed day, through prayers at their places of worship, and through renewed devotion to those high ideals which our mothers have instilled into our hearts.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

DONE at the City of Washington this first day of May in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and seventy-seventh.

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER

By the President:
JOHN FOSTER DULLES,
Secretary of State

Proclamation 3052 – Mother’s Day, 1954
April 29, 1954
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas our mothers are enshrined in our hearts as symbols of those high ideals which have fostered our growth as a great Nation; and

Whereas we are wont to unite on one day each year in paying special tribute to our mothers, whose love and care and teaching have guided us in youth and blessed us in maturity; and

Whereas the Congress gave formal recognition to that custom by a Joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), which set aside the second Sunday in May of each year as Mother’s Day, and requested the President to issue a proclamation calling for the observance of that day:

Now, Therefore, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 9, 1954, be observed as Mother’s Day; and I direct the appropriate officials of the Government to arrange for the display of the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on that day.

I also call upon the people generally to display the flag at their homes or other suitable places, as an expression of love for their own mothers and reverence for the mothers of our country.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

DONE at the City of Washington this 29th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and seventy-eighth.

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER

By the President:
WALTER B. SMITH,
Acting Secretary of State

Proclamation 3092 – Mother’s Day, 1955
May 5, 1955
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas since the earliest days of our history American mothers have inspired our most exalted national ideals through their teachings and by example in their daily lives; and

Whereas it has become our felicitous custom to set aside one day each year for commemorating motherhood and for showing our reverence and love for all the mothers of the land; and

Whereas in recognition of the fitness of such commemoration, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May of each year as Mother’s Day and has requested the President to issue a proclamation calling for the observance of that day:

Now, Therefore, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 8, 1955, be celebrated as Mother’s Day; and I direct the appropriate officials of the Government to arrange for the display of the flag on all Government buildings on that day.

I also call upon the people of the Nation to give public and private expression to the esteem in which our country holds its mothers, through the display of the flag at their homes and other suitable places, through prayers at their places of worship, and through appropriate manifestations of respect and devotion.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

DONE at the City of Washington this fifth day of May in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and seventy-ninth.

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER

By the President:
JOHN FOSTER DULLES,
Secretary of State

Proclamation 3135 – Mother’s Day, 1956
May 1, 1956
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas the American mother stands as a symbol of those high principles and lofty ideals which sustain and enrich our Nation; and

Whereas the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), formalized the felicitous custom of commemorating motherhood by designating the second Sunday in May of each year as Mother’s Day, and requested the President to issue a proclamation calling for the observance of that day; and

Whereas it is fitting that on that day we should acknowledge anew our gratitude, our love, and our reverence for our own mothers and for all mothers of our great Nation:

Now, Therefore, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 13, 1956, be observed as Mother’s Day; and I direct the appropriate officials of the Government to arrange for the display of the flag of the United States on all public buildings on that day.

I also call upon the people generally to give public and private expression to the esteem in which our country holds its mothers through the display of the flag at their homes or other suitable places, through prayers at their places of worship, and through appropriate manifestations of honor and devotion.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

DONE at the City of Washington this first day of May in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eightieth.

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER

By the President:
JOHN FOSTER DULLES,
Secretary of State

Proclamation 3181 – Mother’s Day 1957
May 6, 1957
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas the American mother has ever given her strength to the homes which are at the foundation of our national community; and

Whereas it has become our happy custom to unite on one day each year in giving public acknowledgment to our common bond of gratitude for the love and discipline of motherhood; and

Whereas the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has recognized the fitness of this custom by designating the second Sunday in May of each year as Mother’s Day, and has requested the President to issue a proclamation calling for the observance of that day:

Now, Therefore, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 12, 1957, be observed as Mother’s Day. I also direct the appropriate officials of the Government to arrange for the display of the flag of the United States on all Government buildings, and I urge upon the people of the Nation to display the flag at their homes or other suitable places, on that day.

Let all the sons and daughters of this country pay tribute to their mothers on the appointed day and renew their devotion to the high principles of humanity which mothers exemplify.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

DONE at the City of Washington this sixth day of May in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-seven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eighty-first.

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER

By the President:
CHRISTIAN A. HERTER,
Acting Secretary of State

Proclamation 3238 – Mother’s Day, 1958
May 7, 1958
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas the spirit of motherhood adds strength and grace to the children of men; and

Whereas by precept and example the mothers of America have a daily opportunity to shape the lives and destinies of our citizens; and

Whereas, in recognition of their place in our homes and in our hearts, we are wont to pay special homage to our mothers on one day of each year; and

Whereas the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), gave official recognition to this annual observance by designating the second Sunday in May of each year as Mother’s Day, and by requesting the President to issue a proclamation calling for the celebration of that day:

Now, Therefore, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States of America, do hereby request the observance of Sunday, the eleventh day of May, 1958, as Mother’s Day; and I direct that the flag of the United States be displayed on all Government buildings on that day.

I also call upon the people of the Nation to display the flag at their homes or other suitable places on Mother’s Day, as a public demonstration of our esteem for the mothers of our land; and to reaffirm on that day our gratitude for the heritage of love and honor our own mothers have bequeathed to each one of us.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

DONE at the City of Washington this 7th day of May in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-eight, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eighty-second.

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER

By the President:
CHRISTIAN A. HERTER,
Acting Secretary of State

Proclamation 3291 – Mother’s Day, 1959
May 8, 1959
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas the mothers of America, generation after generation, have given their children their utmost devotion, and by their love, precept, and example have sought to endow them with the ideals, qualities, and strength of a great people; and

Whereas American mothers bear a major responsibility in the tasks of maintaining healthy home environments, of training their children with firmness and wisdom, and of guiding their young men and women to mature citizenship; and

Whereas it is fitting that we should join on one day of each year in acknowledging and expressing the gratitude we feel in our hearts for our own mothers and for the blessings of motherhood; and

Whereas by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), the Congress designated the second Sunday in May of each year as Mother’s Day and enjoined the President to request the observance of this occasion in accordance with the provisions of that resolution:

Now, Therefore, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Sunday, May 10, 1959, to be Mother’s Day; and I direct the appropriate officials of the Government to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on that day.

I also call upon the people of the United States to give public and private expression of their love and reverence for the mothers of America on that day through their prayers and other manifestations of their esteem and devotion, and by display of the flag at their homes or other suitable places.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

DONE at the City of Washington this 8th day of May in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eighty-third.

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER

By the President:
CHRISTIAN A. HERTER,
Secretary of State

John F. Kennedy & mother Rose
John F. Kennedy & mother Rose

Proclamation 3412 – Mothers Day, 1961
May 8, 1961
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas the strength of our Nation depends upon the strength of the American home, where the spiritual, physical, and intellectual development of our children is begun and fostered; and

Whereas the American mother, as the heart of the American home, by her labor and love instills in our homes and nurtures in our children the spirit of our country; and

Whereas it is a cherished American custom to devote one day each year to acknowledging publicly our great affection, gratitude, and respect for our mothers; and

Whereas, in official acknowledgment of these sentiments of our people, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), designated the second Sunday in May of each year as Mother’s Day and requested the President to issue a proclamation calling for the public observance of that day:

Now, Therefore, I, John F. Kennedy, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 14, 1961, be observed as Mother’s Day; and I direct the appropriate officials of the Government to display the flag of the United States on all public buildings on that day.

I also call upon the people of the United States to observe Mother’s Day by display of the flag at their homes or other suitable places, and to manifest through private and public expressions the reverent esteem in which we hold our mothers.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

DONE at the City of Washington this eighth day of May in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and sixty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eighty-fifth.

JOHN F. KENNEDY

By the President:
CHESTER BOWLES,
Acting Secretary of State.

Proclamation 3476 – Mothers Day, 1962
May 5, 1962

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas the American home constitutes the very foundation of our Nation; and

Whereas the mothers of our country embody and foster the virtues of love, devotion, and fortitude upon which our homes are founded; and

Whereas it is appropriate that we devote one day each year to expressing publicly the boundless affection, respect, and gratitude we feel for our mothers; and

Whereas, in official recognition of these feelings, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), designated the second Sunday in May of each year as Mother’s Day and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation calling for the public observance of that day:

Now, Therefore, I, John F. Kennedy, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday May 13, 1962, be observed as Mother’s Day, and I direct that the flag of the United States be displayed on all public buildings on that day.

I also call upon the people of the United States to display the flag at their homes or other suitable places as an expression of the reverent esteem in which they hold the mothers of our country.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

DONE at the City of Washington this fifth day of May in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and sixty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eighty-sixth.

JOHN F. KENNEDY

By the President:
GEORGE W. BALL,
Acting Secretary of State

Proclamation 3535 – Mother’s Day, 1963
April 26, 1963
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas the strength of our Nation depends upon the strength of the American home, which is based on the virtues fostered by the mothers of our country; and

Whereas the American mother plays a vital role by precept and example in building a strong family unit and in teaching our children to become good citizens; and

Whereas it is fitting that we should set aside one day of each year to acknowledge and express publicly our great affection, gratitude, and respect for the mothers of our Nation; and

Whereas by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770) the Congress designated the second Sunday in May of each year as Mother’s Day and requested the President to issue a proclamation calling for the public observance of that day:

Now, Therefore, I, John F. Kennedy, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 12, 1963, be observed as Mother’s Day, and I direct the appropriate officials of the Government to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on that day.

I urge the people of the United States to give expression on that day to their love and gratitude for their mothers publicly by display of the flag at their homes or other suitable places and privately through prayer and thoughtful acts of affection and devotion.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

DONE at the City of Washington this twenty-sixth day of April in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eighty-seventh.

JOHN F. KENNEDY

By the President:
DEAN RUSK,
Secretary of State

Lyndon B. Johnson & mother Rachel
Lyndon B. Johnson & mother Rachel

Proclamation 3583 – Mother’s Day, 1964
April 23, 1964
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas American mothers bear a major responsibility in the tasks of maintaining healthy home environments, of training their young ones with firmness and wisdom, and of guiding their children to mature citizenship; and

AREAS the mothers of our Nation have, in succeeding generations, given their children their utmost devotion, and by their love, precept, and example have sought to endow them with the ideals, qualities, and strength of a great people; and

Whereas it is appropriate that we should join on one day of each year in acknowledging and expressing the gratitude we share for our own mothers and for the blessings of motherhood; and

Whereas by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), the Congress designated the second Sunday in May of each year as Mother’s Day and requested the President to issue a proclamation calling for its observance in accordance with the provisions of that resolution:

Now, Therefore, I, Lyndon B. Johnson, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 10, 1964, be observed as Mother’s Day; and I direct the appropriate officials of the Government to display the .flag of the United States on all Government buildings on that day.

I also call upon the people of this Nation to render public and private expression of their love and reverence for their mothers on that day through the display of the flag at their homes or other suitable places, through prayers, and through other manifestations of their esteem and devotion.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

DONE at the City of Washington this twenty-third day of April in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and sixty-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eighty-eighth.

LYNDON B. JOHNSON

By the President:

Dean Rusk,
Secretary of State.

Proclamation 3654 – Mother’s Day, 1965
April 27, 1965
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Whereas the rapidly changing nature of our world requires more than ever that the American home shall be a haven of stability in which our people can develop their spiritual, intellectual, and physical capacities to the fullest; and

Whereas the mothers of America, in their devotion to their families, seek unselfishly to encourage in our homes, an atmosphere in which the traditions of our Nation can flourish and the highest values of our civilization can be continually nurtured; and

Whereas the respect, gratitude, and love which the mothers of our Nation earn each day should be publicly and specially commemorated each year; and

Whereas by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), the Congress designated the second Sunday in May of each year as Mother’s Day and requested the President to issue a proclamation calling for its observance in accordance with the provisions of that resolution:

Now, Therefore, I, Lyndon B. Johnson, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 9, 1965, be observed as Mother’s Day; and I direct the appropriate officials of the Government to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on that day.

I urge the people of the United States to give public and private expression on that day to the abiding love and gratitude which they bear for their mothers by display of the flag at their homes or other suitable places and through prayer and thoughtful acts of affection and devotion.

I urge all mothers to be ever mindful of their responsibilities for assuring that their children develop into mature men and women prepared to assume the duties and privileges of American citizenship.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

DONE at the City of Washington this 27th day of April in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and sixty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and eighty-ninth.

LYNDON B. JOHNSON

By the President:

DEAN RUSK,
Secretary of State.

Proclamation 3723 – Mother’s Day, 1966
May 6, 1966
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

By love, by teaching, and by example, mothers have shaped the lives of men and the destinies of nations.

Through each succeeding generation American mothers have inspired their children to seek right action, to temper harsh judgment with mercy, to treasure all that is noble in human character.

Each time the courage of its sons is tested in battle, each time the compassion of its people is summoned by tragedy, want, or oppression, America has cause to thank God for the guiding spirit of motherhood.

On the second Sunday in May of each year, we celebrate that spirit and its gifts: mutual affection, steadfast devotion to family life, care and nourishment for the individual soul. On this day and throughout the year, we rejoice in the strength of character American mothers have instilled in generations of our people.

On this day, our minds acknowledge the great debt mankind owes to mothers. Our hearts declare its truth. We resolve anew to make our lives tributes and memorials to those who have proven the most potent and vital force for good in the world—the mothers of men.

On May 8, 1914, the Congress by joint resolution requested the President to issue a proclamation calling for the observance of Mother’s Day.

Now, Therefore, I, Lyndon B. Johnson, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 8, 1966, be observed as Mother’s Day; and I direct the appropriate officials of the Government to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on that day.

I call upon all Americans to make Mother’s Day a truly memorable occasion by expressing both publicly and privately their love and reverence for their mothers through participating in religious and other suitable observances in their honor and through loving acts of affection and esteem.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

DONE at the City of Washington this sixth day of May in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and sixty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninetieth.

LYNDON B. JOHNSON

By the President:

Secretary of State

Proclamation 3784 – Mother’s Day, 1967
May 10, 1967
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

With each passing generation, the words of the poet—”Children are what the mothers are”—take on greater meaning. We become ever more aware that the quality of our society depends in large measure upon the training our children receive in the early years of their lives.

The American mother has borne the major responsibility for that early training.

The fortitude to brave the frontier, the courage to bear our flag in battle, the compassion to help the needy and the weak at home and in distant lands—all these have come to our people through traits of character instilled by our mothers.

It is fitting that we should set aside one day each year to pay tribute to our mothers—to thank God for their loving devotion, their moral teaching, and their steadfastness in all the weathers of our souls.

To this end, the Congress more than fifty years ago designated the second Sunday in May of each year as Mother’s Day and requested the President to issue a proclamation calling for its observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Lyndon B. Johnson, President of the United States of America, pursuant to the joint resolution of May 8, 1914, do hereby request that Sunday, May 14, 1967, be observed as Mother’s Day; and I direct the appropriate officials of the Government to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on that day.

I call upon all Americans on that day to pay special tribute to mothers—to our own mothers and to the mothers of our children—through the display of the flag at their homes or other suitable places, through prayers, and through other acts of love and devotion.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

DONE at the City of Washington this tenth day of May in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and sixty-seven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninety-first.

LYNDON B. JOHNSON

By the President:

DEAN RUSK

Secretary of State

Proclamation 3848 – Mother’s Day, 1968
April 29, 1968
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The hope, the courage, and the faith that guide us through all our lives are priceless gifts that go back in time beyond our first recollections. They were given us by our mothers and enriched with each passing year.

To the extent that each of us makes use of these gifts, our adult lives will reflect our faith, our compassion, and our strength to meet our problems and obligations, and to deal with them wisely and justly in the finest traditions of our national character. Thus the training and love that we receive from our mothers play mighty roles in determining the quality of our adult lives—individually, and as a Nation.

Once each year, our Nation sets aside a special day to pay tribute to our mothers. This day, pursuant to a joint resolution of the Congress approved on May 8, 1914, falls each year on the second Sunday of May.

Now, Therefore, I, Lyndon B. Johnson, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 12, 1968, be observed as Mother’s Day, and I direct the appropriate officials of the Government to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on that day.

Let us pay a special tribute to those courageous mothers of our gallant fighting men on the battlefields of Vietnam. Let us honor both mother and son for their personal commitment to honor and duty that reflects the Nation’s dedication to a search for a lasting peace.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 29th day of April, in the year of our Lord ninteen hundred and sixty-eight, and of the Independence of the United States of American the one hundred and ninety-second.

LYNDON B. JOHNSON

Richard Nixon & mother Hannah
Richard Nixon & mother Hannah

Proclamation 3910 – Mother’s Day, 1969
April 25, 1969
By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

Fifty-five years ago President Woodrow Wilson called upon the American people to display the flag as “a public expression of our love and reverence for the mothers of the country.” The United States of America and the world have changed greatly since then, but the desire and need for a public display of love and affection for our mothers has remained.

How has such a day of commemoration survived the changes of taste, of value, of belief that have marked these years? I am convinced that the answer lies in the fact that the essential things never change at all. Mother’s Day is set aside not only to publicly demonstrate what we all privately feel about our mothers, but for another purpose: it serves to remind us all that there is, at the heart of things, a sense of mystery and wonder, a dimly-understood but strongly felt feeling of continuity and interdependence which binds all men together and which is most clearly seen in the miracle of motherhood.

Nowhere in the complexity of the modern world are we more forcefully reminded of the power of love against hate, of creation over destruction, of life against death than in the gentle strength, the deep compassion of a mother.

On Mother’s Day we demonstrate to our mothers not only love for who they are but reverence for what they represent: the sacredness of human life and the majesty of the ancient principles which enhance it and guide it toward public and private virtue.

A joint resolution of the Congress, approved on May 8, 1914, sets aside the second Sunday of May as the special day to pay tribute to our mothers.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 11, 1969, be observed as Mother’s Day; and I direct the appropriate officials of the Government to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on that day.

I call upon the people of the United States to honor the mothers of our country by displaying the flag at their homes or other suitable places and by expressions of love and respect.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 25th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and sixty-nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninety-third.

RICHARD NIXON

Proclamation 3984 – Mother’s Day, 1970
May 5, 1970
By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

In special recognition of the high esteem in which this nation holds mothers, we have customarily set aside a day to honor them.

The Congress by joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, declared that the second Sunday in May would be designated as Mother’s Day, and requested the President to call for its observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 10, 1970, be observed as Mother’s Day. I direct government officials to display the flag of the United States on all government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fourth.

RICHARD NIXON

Proclamation 4051 – Mother’s Day, 1971
May 7, 1971
By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

Throughout this Nation’s history, American mothers have played a very special role—helping to pioneer the land, enriching our community life, and bringing deeper meaning to the lives of their husbands and children.

In recent years we have come to appreciate more than ever before the influential contribution mothers can make in the extended community beyond the home. But even as new horizons are opened for many mothers, each mother’s responsibility to her children still defines her central role.

In our society, we want to see each person fulfill his unique potential. It is fitting therefore that we recognize and honor the part that mothers play in the development of their children—even as we welcome new opportunities for mothers to contribute to the Nation’s life.

The Congress, by a joint resolution of May 8, 1914, has set aside the second Sunday of May of each year as a day on which we honor all mothers for their countless contributions to their own families, to their communities, and to the Nation.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 9, 1971, be observed throughout the land as Mother’s Day. I direct Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day as a public expression of love and respect for the mothers of our country.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 7th day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Proclamation 4134 – Mother’s Day, 1972
May 11, 1972
By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

There is a story about a little girl who said to her mother, in one of those bursts of exaggeration that children sometimes have, “Mama, I am nearer to you than I am to Papa.” Her mother asked what she meant by such a strange remark. “Why,” her daughter replied, “I am your own little girl, but I am only related to papa by marriage.”

The point seems to survive a child’s exaggeration. In fact, where mothers are concerned most of us always retain something of that same feeling. A mother’s gift of life and love often are the animating spirit of a family. And it has been the family which has passed on to future generations the values which have fashioned our Nation’s progress over the years.

In 1972, we honor mothers for these contributions and more. In addition to the vital force they have always represented in family life, many mothers are now finding greater opportunities to pursue careers outside the home. In the home and outside the home they make a special contribution to the vitality and spirit of America.

Fifty-eight years ago, Woodrow Wilson proclaimed the second Sunday of May as the special day to honor our mothers, calling upon the American people to make “a public expression of our love and reverence for the mothers of the country.”

The Congress, by a joint resolution of May 8, 1914, has set aside the second Sunday of May of each year as a day in which we honor all mothers for their countless contributions to their own families, to their communities, and to the Nation.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 14, 1972, be observed as Mother’s Day; and I direct appropriate officials of the Government to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings.

I urge the people of the United States to show their reverence and respect for the mothers of this country by special expressions of affection and gratitude.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of May in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Proclamation 4217 – Mother’s Day, 1973
May 11, 1973
By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

For nearly 60 years, this Nation has set aside one day each year to recognize the enormous responsibility a mother bears for the development of her children and our future citizens. Mother’s Day also provides a special opportunity for a grateful Nation to pay tribute to other contributions that the mothers of America are making to our national life.

Today we are in the midst of a national movement to ensure equal rights for women. This movement has helped bring millions of additional women into the work force, performing highly skilled and challenging jobs—many of them previously filled by men. Great numbers of these women are mothers who are pursuing careers even while they continue to carry out major family responsibilities.

American women have made wide-ranging contributions to our country throughout its history. Pioneer women helped push westward the American frontier. Women have filled countless industrial positions in wartime when men have entered the Armed Forces. In medicine, science, law, education and every other profession, women have helped this country achieve unparalleled successes.

It is appropriate on this Mother’s Day that we honor mothers of every generation:

—Older mothers, many of whom are widowed and living alone.

—Mothers in their middle years who began careers after their children, were grown.

—Younger mothers who devote full time to their family responsibilities.

—Mothers who, in addition to their vital role at home, are engaged in volunteer service or employment that is of inestimable value to our economy and the quality of American life.

And particularly, this year, we honor the mothers and wives of those who served in the Vietnam war, especially those whose loved ones lost, their lives or were held as prisoners of war.

The Congress, by a joint resolution of May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), designated the second Sunday of May each year as a day on which to honor all mothers for their countless contributions to their families, their communities, and the Nation.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America do hereby request that Sunday, May 13, 1973, be observed as Mother’s Day. I urge Government officials and all citizens to mark that day by displaying the flag of the United States and by participating in appropriate observances.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-seventh.

RICHARD NIXON

Proclamation 4285 – Mother’s Day, 1974
April 16, 1974
By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

Over three million children were born in the United States last year, and the job of guiding them to maturity will be carried out primarily by their mothers. There is no undertaking more challenging, no responsibility more awesome.

In addition to carrying out their family responsibilities, mothers are today, as never before, moving into other highly skilled jobs and careers. Barriers against equal opportunity for women have been disappearing rapidly, but we must remain diligent in our effort to remove them.

I am particularly pleased that this year we can celebrate Mother’s Day in a world in which America is at peace, a world in which no American mother need fear for the well-being of a husband or son in a far-off land.

The Congress, by a joint resolution of May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), designated the second Sunday of May each year as the day on which we honor all mothers for their countless contributions to their families, to their communities and to their Nation.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 12, 1974, he observed as Mother’s Day. I direct Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-eighth.

RICHARD NIXON

Gerald Ford & mother Dorothy
Gerald Ford & mother Dorothy

Proclamation 4368 – Mother’s Day, 1975
April 22, 1975
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

We Americans have traditionally set aside one day each year to give special honor to our mothers. In 1975, International Women’s Year, this tribute takes on even greater significance.

Of the many occupations in which women serve today, one of the most demanding is that of being a mother. It is demanding not only because of the skills, knowledge and perseverance required, but because of the importance of success. There is no area of endeavor which can have a greater impact on our future than the care and guidance of our children and young people. It is appropriate that we observe Mother’s Day in a manner which acknowledges our appreciation for our own mothers and our respect for all of those who perform this vital role in our society.

The Congress, by a joint resolution of May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770, 36 U.S.C. 141, 142), designated the second Sunday in May of each year as a day on which we honor all mothers for their countless contributions to their families, to their communities and to the Nation.

Now, Therefore, I, Gerald R. Ford, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 11, 1975, be observed as Mother’s Day. I call upon government officials to display the flag of the United States on all government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-ninth.

GERALD R. FORD

Proclamation 4437 – Mother’s Day, 1976
May 5, 1976
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

By responding to new challenges, and assuming new roles, America’s women are contributing much to the enrichment of American society.

But for all that women do, there is no undertaking more challenging, no responsibility more awesome, than that of being a mother. Motherhood is more than a life role, it is a job that is continuously demanding and rewarding. A mother’s guidance is most significant in the growth of her children into responsible, self-reliant, understanding and productive human beings.

For all of their immeasurable and unselfish sacrifices in developing the character of our youth, that which is synonymous with love, creation, compassion, honor and integrity we are grateful for their countless contributions to their families, to their communities, and to the Nation. Each year we especially and significantly honor the role of motherhood on Mother’s Day, the second Sunday in May as designated by the Congress (38 Stat. 770, 36 U.S.C. 141, 142).

Now, Therefore, I, Gerald R. Ford, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 9, 1976, be observed as Mother’s Day. I call upon government officials to display the flag of the United States on all government buildings, and I ask all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day, and to remember our mothers in some very special way.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundredth.

GERALD R. FORD

Remarks at the Awards Dinner of the American Mother’s Committee, Inc.
May 5, 1976
Thank you very, very much, Mrs. Lohr, Congresswoman Boggs, Mayor Washington, Mrs. Marriott, distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen:

Let me thank you for this very beautiful, this very impressive book, which I understand is inscribed to both Betty and to myself. And I can assure you, as a stand-in for her, that she wants me to express on her behalf our appreciation for this thoughtfulness.

I thank not only you, Mrs. Lohr, but the American Mothers Committee and the many hundreds of people who helped to write–as you told us 500 or more-and the tremendous job of research that they did on this occasion. It is a very, very fitting contribution to our Bicentennial.

No birthday is complete without credit to the mother, and on this Nation’s 200th birthday, we recall the achievements of all American mothers, past and present, who contributed to our Nation’s progress. Of course, Betty is highly honored that she was chosen among those from Michigan to be included in this volume.

And I am proud not just of her own accomplishments but because I know Betty represents so many American mothers who hold their families together and help to hold this Nation together. Every mother faces a different set of challenges. For Betty–if I may add a personal note–I know it was the challenge of raising four wonderful children when my duties in the Congress often called for me to be away from home. And Lindy Boggs, I can assure you, can verify that experience.

As your organization so rightly recognizes, a successful mother must embody virtues such as love, courage, cheerfulness, patience, compassion, understanding, and the ability to make a happy home for her family.

Those characteristics are every bit as important today as they have been throughout our Nation’s history and, indeed, throughout the history of civilization. In fact, at a time when the value of family life is being questioned by some and when the strains of contemporary life seem to threaten the family structure, I believe those virtues are more important than ever before.

Every American mother bears, as we all know, a great, great responsibility. As your conference theme states, the past cannot be changed; the future is still in your power. It is in the family that a child’s character is formed and ethical standards developed. It is up to you and your husbands to see that America’s children are raised in an atmosphere of morality as well as love.

It is up to you to see your children take joy in living and develop strength and self-confidence. It is up to you to see that the next generation of all Americans will carry with them throughout their lives the values that have made America a great, free nation. Mothers and fathers establish within their own homes the duties of their children, and they help their children to recognize the obligations that come with being a responsible citizen.

In this Bicentennial Year, all Americans must rededicate themselves to the values on which this country was founded: that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, and that among these rights are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

You give your children life to teach your children the meaning of liberty, its duties as well as its privileges, and you put them on the path to finding their own personal happiness. This combination of responsibilities is what makes motherhood a career in itself, a strenuous, rewarding job.

But as millions of Americans demonstrate, American mothers prove every day the career of raising a family need not exclude other careers. Today, mothers are more likely to be working than ever before–five times as likely as 1940. More than half of all mothers with school-age children were in the labor force last year, a higher rate than for women without children. But whether or not they work outside their homes, America’s mothers make countless contributions to their families, to their communities, and to their Nation.

Tonight, the American Mothers Committee honors that contribution and chooses one American mother who embodies the best in all American mothers. It was John Quincy Adams who said, “All that I am, my mother made me;” that thought was repeated by Abraham Lincoln, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and many others. And as Mother’s Day this Sunday draws near, it is a thought that should be in the hearts of millions of Americans. I know it will be in mine and in yours.
On behalf of your children, your families, and your Nation, I thank you.

And now, the national president of the American Mother’s Committee will announce the name of the 1976 National American Mother.
Thank you very much.

Jimmy Carter & mother Lillian
Jimmy Carter & mother Lillian

Proclamation 4503 – Mother’s Day, 1977
April 21, 1977
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Recent shifts in our culture and society have created new patterns of life for many American mothers and families.

Some of these changes have been desirable, and some not so desirable. But all have put new burdens on the women who must adapt to the shifts–the mothers of America.

By and large they have met the challenge of change with grace, intelligence, and dignity.

Mother’s Day should no longer be merely a day on which we reaffirm our love for our mothers. It should also be an occasion for admiration of the way American mothers have maintained those family bonds that protect us from the uncertainties of a changing society and give meaning and direction to our lives.

And it should be an occasion for those of us in public life to reflect on what government can do to help the mothers of America keep our families strong.

In recognition of the contributions of all mothers to their families and to the Nation, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), designated the second Sunday in May each year as Mother’s Day and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Jimmy Carter, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 8, 1977, be observed as Mother’s Day. I call upon government officials to display the flag of the United States on all government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 21st day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-seven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and first.

JIMMY CARTER

Proclamation 4570 – Mother’s Day, 1978
May 11, 1978
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Motherhood is a lifelong commitment.

It is a promise to share in fulfilling all the unique potential of a helpless newborn child, and to shape that person into an independent, responsible adult. For some, motherhood means guiding bright minds, strong bodies, and exquisite talents-maintaining a delicate balance between humanity and the special gifts of God. For others, motherhood means helping a weak body or an unawakened mind overcome burdens that may often seem too great to bear. For both, motherhood brings the privilege of seeing the tired world through fresh eyes and the satisfaction of knowing that one has met another’s needs in a way no other could.

To the mothers of America, in recognition of their achievements in the art of raising a new generation of Americans and as an acknowledgment of all they have done to shape our national character, the Congress, by joint resolution of May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770; 36 U.S.C. 141), has set aside the second Sunday in May of each year as a day of special tribute.

Now, Therefore, I, Jimmy Carter, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 14, 1978, be observed throughout our nation as Mother’s Day. I ask all Americans to take this opportunity to express their personal gratitude to their own mothers and to thank all those women whose tireless devotion to their families has so enriched our nation.

I ask all public officials to display the flag of the United States on all government buildings and urge all Americans to display our flag at their homes or other suitable places on that day as a public expression of our love for the mothers of our country.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-eight, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and second.

JIMMY CARTER

Proclamation 4646 – Mother’s Day, 1979
March 16, 1979
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

For 65 years we have set aside a special day to honor all American mothers and acknowledge the important contribution of mothers to the future of their children and of our Nation.

The activities and aspirations of many American women have changed dramatically in recent years. Whether or not they combine employment outside the home with their other responsibilities, the fundamental commitment of mothers to the welfare, development and future opportunities of their children remains as strong as that of mothers in past generations.

In this time when the family is subjected to many new pressures, the job of nurturing future generations is often both more difficult and more important than ever. Our children remain our major resource, and preserving the valuable aspects of our heritage while working to build a better world for the future is the duty of all Americans.

Our Nation has made great progress in providing educational opportunities, health care and adequate nutrition for our children, but we still have much to do to make sure all our children are able to develop their full potential. In addition to these basic necessities, parents must provide the love and training that produces the critical spiritual and social values as well as the motivation and self-discipline their children will need to live fruitful lives.

Mother’s Day affords us an opportunity to express our thanks to our own mothers, and to honor the devotion, dedication and service of all mothers.

Now, Therefore, I, Jimmy Carter, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 13, 1979, be observed as Mother’s Day. I direct Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings. I urge all citizens to display the flag in appropriate ways as a sign of their gratitude to the mothers of America, and to seek ways to aid and support the important efforts of American mothers to provide the kind of influences and resources their children need to develop into strong, honest, capable and happy adults.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth day of March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and third.

JIMMY CARTER

Proclamation 4743 – Mother’s Day, 1980
April 1, 1980
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Each year, we set aside a special day of celebration to thank this Nation’s mothers for the role they play in our lives.

Mother’s Day 1980 finds the always demanding role of being a mother made even more complex by the choices modern women have that were not available to women of previous generations.

Today’s mothers are involved in every aspect of business, politics, education, sports, the arts, the sciences, and government, and yet they still remain at the core of this Nation’s greatest natural resource?the American family.

Whether they seek careers or work full time in the home, mothers contribute immensely to our Nation’s future by shaping the character of our children.

That is why our observance of Mother’s Day is so important. It provides us not only with an opportunity to honor our own mothers, but also to thank all the women who make this Nation stronger through their tireless devotion to their children.

Now, Therefore, I, Jimmy Carter, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 11, 1980, be observed as Mother’s Day. I direct Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fourth.

JIMMY CARTER

Ronald Reagan & mother Nelle
Ronald Reagan & mother Nelle

Proclamation 4834 – Mother’s Day, 1981
April 13, 1981
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Each year our Nation designates Mother’s Day as a moment of special tribute and appreciation for the mothers of America.

Recent years have brought many changes to the lives of American mothers. Today they are increasingly involved in business, politics, education, arts, sciences, and government as well as the vital work of .the home and family. Yet, whether they seek careers outside the home or work as homemakers, they remain the heart of the American family.

They shape the character of our people through the love and nurture of their children. It is the strength they give their families that keeps our Nation strong.

On this Mother’s Day, we express our deep personal gratitude to our own mothers and thank all those women whose devotion to their families helps sustain a healthy and productive citizenry.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Sunday, May 10, 1981, as Mother’s Day. I direct Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal Government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirteenth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred eightyone, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fifth.

RONALD REAGAN

Proclamation 4922 – Mother’s Day, 1982
April 5, 1982
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Each year this Nation designates the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day—a day on which to recognize and honor mothers for the roles they play in our families and society.

In recent years, the shape of family life has been changing. Increasing numbers of mothers have added outside paid employment to their traditional roles, and, similarly, fathers in increasing numbers are sharing home responsibilities with them.

Mothers nourish and support bodies, minds and Souls; encourage good health; nurse illness; overcome discouragement and cheer success. They create and sustain an atmosphere that helps children and families thrive.

Mother’s Day gives all of us an opportunity to thank our own mothers for their devotion and to acknowledge that every mother is essential to her family—the social unit on which our society is built.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 9, 1982, be observed as Mother’s Day. I direct government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 5th day of April in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and sixth.

RONALD REAGAN

Proclamation 5042 – Mother’s Day, 1983
April 6, 1983
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Traditionally, this Nation honors its mothers by designating the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day.

To our mothers we owe our highest esteem, for it is from their gift of life that the flow of events begins that shapes our destiny. A mother’s love, nurturing, and beliefs are among the strongest influences molding the development and character of our youngsters. As Henry Ward Beecher wrote, “What a mother sings to the cradle goes all the way down to the coffin.”

Motherhood is both a great responsibility and one of the most rewarding and pleasurable experiences life has to offer. Mother’s Day presents a special opportunity to appreciate our mothers—to consider all they have done, and all they continue to do, in fostering children’s physical and emotional growth, nursing illness, encouraging success, easing failure, maintaining family life, supporting their spouses, contributing vitally to the economy through their accomplishments at work, and serving their communities. The quality and scope of their activities, as well as their overriding concern for the well-being of their families and our country, inspires and strengthens us as individuals and as a Nation.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 8, 1983, be observed as Mother’s Day. I direct Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal Government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof I have hereunto set my hand this 6th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventh.

RONALD REAGAN

 

Radio Address to the Nation on the Observance of Mother’s Day
May 7, 1983


My fellow Americans:

This is a very special weekend in American life, a time specially set aside to honor our mothers and the mothers of our children. As we do, we acknowledge their role as the heart of our families and reinforce our families as the cornerstone of our society.

In our families, and often from our mothers, we first learn about values and eating and the difference between right and wrong. Those of us blessed with loving families draw our confidence from them and the strength we need to face the world. We also first learn at home, and, again, often from our mothers, about the God who will guide us through life.

The mothers we honor this weekend, young or not so young, partners or alone, well-to-do or sometimes agonizingly poor, are as diverse as our varied population. But they share a commitment to future generations and a yearning to improve the world their children will inherit. They shape the America we know today and are now molding the character of our country tomorrow.

Since men seem to have written most of our history books, the role of women and mothers in our communities and families has not always been given its due. But the truth is the wild west could never have been tamed, the vast prairies never plowed, nor God and learning brought to the corners of our continent without the strength, bravery, and influence of our grandmothers, great-grandmothers, and the women who came before them.

Living through blizzards, plagues, prairie fires, and floods, these women made homes and started families, organized churches, and built schools. They served as teachers, field hands, physicians, and the center of the family.

I was reading a book recently about Kansas frontier women and came across a passage that seemed to sum it all up. Esther Clark wrote, “Mother has always been the gamest one of us. I can remember her hanging onto the reins of a runaway mule team, her black hair tumbling out of its pins and over her shoulders, her face set and white while one small girl clung with chattering teeth to the sides of the rocking wagon and a baby sister bounced about on the floor in paralyzed wonder.

“I remember, too, the things the men said about Leny’s nerve. But I think as much courage as it took to hang onto the reins that day, it took more to live 24 hours at a time, month in and out on the lonely and lovely prairie without giving up to the loneliness.”

Of course, Leny’s nerve and strength are echoed in modern-day women and mothers who face different but equally trying tests of their courage. There are mothers like Rachel Ressow of Connecticut, for example, and Dorothy DeBolt of California, who with their husbands have adopted between them 25 handicapped boys and girls in addition to their own children.

I had a chance to visit with Rachel and her family last month, and I can tell you I’ve never seen a happier group. I know the strains on them must be great, emotionally and financially, but not as great as the love they feel for each other.

Of course, many millions of American mothers are quiet, everyday heroes struggling to stretch budgets and too often maintaining their families alone. Many also contribute to society through full-time careers, and others are forced to work just to make ends meet. They’re raising children in a fast-paced world where basic values are constantly questioned. Their monumental challenge is to bring their children into adulthood, healthy and whole, nurturing their physical and emotional growth while avoiding the pitfalls of drug abuse and crime.

The lives of American mothers today are far removed from the prairies, and yet they have a nobility about them, too. Government should help, not hinder parents in this task. And that’s why our policies have been designed to restore the family to its rightful place in our society, combat the inflation that stole from family budgets, expand opportunity through a renewed economy and hasten the return of values and principles that made America both great and good.

On the economic front, I think we’ve made some solid progress in bringing relief to your financially strapped families. When we took office, inflation was at 12.4 percent, but it’s only been one-half of i percent for the last 6 months. You can see a difference on the grocery shelves. A loaf of bread, for example, costs only 2 cents more now than it did in 1980. If we’d continued with the old rate of inflation, by now it would have cost 11 cents more. Milk is about 16 cents cheaper than it would have been, hamburger about 18 cents cheaper per pound, and the savings on a dozen eggs is as much as 50 cents. I don’t have to tell the people who do the shopping how these savings add up. But for those of you who don’t, we estimate that a family of four on a fixed income of $20,000 has $1,700 more in purchasing power this year than they would have had under the old inflation rate.

The progress we’re making with the economy, just like the national renewal we’re seeing spring up all around us, is the product of our reliance again on good old-fashioned common sense, renewed belief in ourselves, and faith in God.

Now and then I find guidance and direction in the worn brown Bible I used to take the oath of office. It’s been the Reagan family Bible and, like many of yours, has its flyleaf filled with important events, its margins are scrawled with insights and passages underlined for emphasis. My mother, Nelle, made all those marks in that book. She used it to instruct her two young sons, and I look to it still.

A passage in Proverbs describes the ideal woman, saying: “Strength and dignity are her clothing, and she smiles at the future. She opens her mouth in wisdom, and the teaching of kindness is on her tongue. Give her the product of her hands, and let her works praise her in the gates.”

Well, that passage calls for us to recognize the enormous strengths and contributions of women, wives, and mothers and indicates to me that society always needs a little reminding. Well, let us use this weekend as a symbol that we will always remember, reward, and recognize them and use their examples of love and courage as inspiration to be better than we are.

Till next week, thanks for listening, and God bless you.

Proclamation 5173 – Mother’s Day, 1984
April 3, 1984
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

By tradition, the second Sunday in May is designated as Mother’s Day, a day on which we honor and think about our mothers.

Almost every woman in our Nation looks forward to the rewards and joys of motherhood without overlooking the long-term effort that raising children demands. We are grateful to mothers for their willingness to give of themselves for their children’s well-being, for their wholehearted belief in their offspring, for their love, for being wellsprings of hope, and for all the support they lend to us throughout life.

Motherhood is both a great responsibility and one of the most unique, rewarding, and pleasurable experiences life has to offer. Just as the family is the basis of a strong nation, so dedicated mothers are frequently the key to strong families. The quality and scope of their activities, as well as their overriding concern for the well-being of their families and the future of our country, inspire and strengthen us as individuals and as a Nation.

In recognition of the contributions of all mothers to their families and to the Nation, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), designated the second Sunday in May each year as Mother’s Day and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 13, 1984, be observed as Mother’s Day. I direct Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 3rd day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eightyfour, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighth.

RONALD REAGAN

Remarks During a Visit to the Jeanne Jugan Residence on Mother’s Day
May 13, 1984
Mother Mary Agnes, thank you for inviting us here today.

Since the Little Sisters of the Poor was founded in 1839, the order has spread to 34 countries on 5 continents and cared for more than a million of the elderly today, of my generation. And here in Washington, although this home is only a year old, it replaced one that was operated by the Little Sisters of the Poor for more than a century.

And throughout all these decades, you’ve cared for the elderly in our Capital City who had nowhere else to go. You’ve brought them into a warm and happy home. And you’ve given them, in addition to the necessities, the thing that only the love of others can bestow: dignity.

I know that for your financial support, you depend on individual donations, and I can’t think of any worthier cause than the Little Sisters of the Poor. And on behalf of all those you’ve done so very much to help, I thank you.

You know, Nancy and I, coming down here from Camp David on the helicopter, we couldn’t help but be thinking about this particular day and what it was. I think in hindsight, perhaps, I realize more about my mother than—and as so many of us do, did not at the time—Nelle was a little woman, auburn hair, and, I realize now, had a strength through some very trying times that held our family together. We were poor, but the government didn’t come around and tell us we were, so— [laughter] —we didn’t know it. And probably we didn’t know it because Nelle was always finding someone that was worse off then we were that needed help.

And my father was hard-working. He had a sense of humor. He also had a very great problem, but my mother saw that my brother and I, from the time we were children, understood that problem and that it was something—a sickness, and that he was not to be blamed, but to be loved.

And she taught us about life, I think, by her deeds as well as her words. She had never gone beyond—in education—beyond elementary school, but she had a different kind of education that I think has been imprinted and a faith that I know now has been bestowed on me.

I’d like to just tell a little anecdote about it. Some years after I was in Hollywood, I was able to bring my parents out there, and she immediately started finding people. And one she found was a county tubercular sanitarium that could provide, as a public institution could of that kind, the necessary care, but certainly failed in some of the homelike atmosphere that was necessary.

And my mother went to work, and she visited that place regularly. She arranged for movies to be shown and for television and things of that kind that they had never had before. And one night—and she has left us now—but one night I was at a banquet. I was the speaker at a banquet. And a few years ago, banquet food wasn’t of the same quality that it is today. And the waiter that was coming along leaned down to me and whispered and said, “Would you rather have a big steak than what we’re serving here?”

“Well,” I said, “if that’s possible, yes,”- [laughter] —because I did a lot of banquet speaking in those days, and I’d had enough of banquet food. Well, he arrived back with the nicest, big T-bone steak you ever saw and put it in front of me.

Now, in the meantime, I had decided that he had to be a motion picture fan, and he must have liked my pictures. And I was basking in that kind of reflected glory. And as he put the steak down, he leaned down and whispered in my ear, “Anytime, for a relative of Nelle Reagan’s. I used to be a patient at Olive View Sanitarium.” [Laughter]

But Nancy, at the same time—and this is a coincidence—thank heaven, Nancy’s mother is still with us—Nancy’s mother, living in Chicago, was one of a kind also. I don’t think there was a policeman or a doorman or a cabdriver or anyone like that in Chicago that didn’t know Edith Davis, because she, too, was always engaged in good works. And we saw a classic example of that.

Nancy and I got off the train, the New York Twentieth Century Limited in Chicago, in the midst of a blizzard and laden with bags and baggage and so forth from the trip we’d been on. Everyone else—and not a redcap, not a porter in sight and everyone struggling with their bags and everything. And we—this whole length of the train to go—and all of sudden looked down, and here came Nancy’s mother, arm in arm with two redcaps. [Laughter]

And as she got closer, we could hear, she was asking the one about his children. She knew his children’s names, knew all about them, what grade they were in, and was talking to him. The other one, asked about his wife’s operation. She knew all about that, too. And just happened to stop by us and say, “Oh, these are my children. Could you give them a hand with their bags?” [Laughter] And a whole trainload of people saw us stride down the platform with Nancy’s mother and with the two porters, and they were still trying to manage with their bags, and we had plenty of help.

But I think things like this make me understand what Abe Lincoln was feeling when he said, “All that I am or hope to be, I owe to my mother.”

And I know there are many of you mothers in this room. I also know that there are others who live as mothers live, the Little Sisters of the Poor, 17 who are residents in this home and together with the 4,500 Little Sisters around the world who have chosen to give of themselves completely in humble service to their fellow men and women. The residents are your family. Your prayers and hard work have made this a very friendly and, it’s very obvious, a joyful home.

And thank you all for allowing us to share this special day with you. And we wish each one of you a very happy and. rewarding Mother’s Day and the blessings of our beloved God.
Thank you.

Proclamation 5332 – Mother’s Day, 1985
April 29, 1985
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

For most of this century, we have set aside the second Sunday in May as a special day when we honor our mothers. It is very appropriate that we do so because from the earliest days of our country, mothers have played a major role in building America into a great Nation. The fortitude, courage, and love of family and country shown by these brave pioneer women lives on in mothers today.

It is especially important that we honor mothers today, because we are more aware than ever before of the importance of the family unit, in which mothers play so central a role. Families are truly the foundation of society, and mothers the vital foundation of the life of the family. Their influence on the training and education of our youth is so deep and pervasive that it is impossible to measure.

When we honor mothers, therefore, we honor the women who shape our Nation’s future. Their collective effect on the America our children will inherit is greater than that of any act of Congress or any Presidential decision. I am happy, therefore, to have this chance once a year to pay them tribute.

In recognition of the contributions of all mothers to their families and to the Nation, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as Mother’s Day and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 12, 1985, be observed as Mother’s Day. I direct government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-ninth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and ninth.

RONALD REAGAN

Radio Address to the Nation on the Trip to Europe and Mother’s Day
May 11, 1985
My fellow Americans:

I’ve just completed an extraordinary 10-day visit to Europe, where I attended the Bonn Economic Summit and helped mark with European leaders the 40th anniversary of V-E Day. It was an exciting trip and a demanding one, and it left Nancy and me with a number of unforgettable memories.

But sometimes the most memorable moment is something you notice by chance, that hits your heart and yields an unforgettable image. For me it was the sight of an elderly woman standing among the onlookers as we drove through the streets of Strasbourg, France, on the way to the European Parliament to help mark the 40th anniversary of V-E Day.

Most of the onlookers waved and smiled, but the elderly woman who had stepped off the sidewalk and onto the street was waving a handkerchief in the air and smiling and yelling “Hello.” She looked just like the young French women who waved their handkerchiefs 40 years ago as the American convoys drove through the newly freed nation of France, and then I realized, maybe she was one of those young women. And as we drove by her, I thought perhaps she knows better than all of us what the anniversary of V-E Day is all about.

It was a wonderful trip, but it’s good to be home. And it’s especially good to be home this weekend because tomorrow is a holiday very close to our hearts—it’s Mother’s Day.

Mothers are the creators of the family, and the family is the center of society. It’s no accident that America chose to honor all mothers with a special holiday. After all, mothers have made a unique contribution to our country. They’re the main communicators of the values by which our nation has flourished for more than 200 years—the values of honesty, responsibility, decency, and personal effort. By imparting these and other values to our children, the mothers of America quite literally shape the future.

Mother’s Day takes on a special significance this year for a number of reasons. One is the extraordinary phenomenon of the mothers of America joining together to press for much needed change in our society. There’s Mothers Against Drunk Driving, the remarkable group started by a woman whose daughter was killed several years ago by a drunk driver. MADD, as it is called, has been responsible for helping bring tougher laws against drunk drivers in many States. The group has also heightened public awareness of the problem of drunk driving and made our children more aware of its hazards.

There is also the growing number of women who’ve joined in the fight against drug abuse. Recently in Washington there was a very important conference for the wives of 17 heads of state and government leaders on how they can strengthen families and help combat the epidemic of drug addiction among our children. That meeting was conceived and chaired by another Reagan named Nancy. I’m deeply proud of her involvement in this crusade, proud of her heartfelt commitment and the sacrifices she’s made to help children in their struggle against drug addiction. Nancy, like any mother, feels pain when she sees and hears the cry of a child. So, I hope you don’t mind my taking this moment to say thanks Nancy and happy Mother’s Day.

And like all of you, I find my thoughts turning to my own mother, Nelle Reagan. She was truly a remarkable woman—ever so strong in her determination yet always tender, always giving of herself to others. She never found time in her life to complain; she was too busy living those values she sought to impart in my brother and myself. She was the greatest influence on my life, and as I think of her this weekend I remember the words of Lincoln, “All that I am, or hope to be, I owe to my mother.”

There’s a group of mothers I’d like to mention, whose lives aren’t remarked upon enough, but who should be given special mention today. That is the group of mothers who’ve made an extraordinary personal commitment by adopting children with special needs. These are mothers who have adopted older children, often foster children, and mothers who have taken in children who are unwell, either emotionally or physically, or who need special care of one sort or another. No one knows the heartaches and joys these mothers go through helping those who are most in need of a parent’s loving concern.

Finally, one other group deserves special honors, it’s the largest of all—the working mothers of America. Some devote their full time to raising families, others combine that responsibility with jobs in the marketplace. Some are breadwinners; others are not. But all deserve our respect and thanks. All of these mothers work hard; in fact, they must be the hardest working people in America. Happy Mother’s Day to these and all other mothers.

Until next week, thanks for listening, and God bless you.

Proclamation 5466 – Mother’s Day, 1986
April 22, 1986

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

By tradition, the second Sunday in May is designated as Mother’s Day, one of America’s best-loved holidays. It gives us all a special occasion to honor our own, and to praise the unique dignity of motherhood one of life’s highest callings.

Thomas Jefferson called motherhood “the keystone of the arch of matrimonial happiness,” and we must always remember that with love, strength, and fortitude, the American mother assisted in the settlement, development, and prosperity of our country. Her contributions to the well-being of the family, the community, and the Nation are beyond all reckoning. A Jewish saying sums it up: “God could not be everywhere—so He created mothers.”

The role of the mother has changed constantly in our society, but its fundamental meaning abides: love and caring. The modern mother is conquering new worlds. She continues to be the heart of the family and the hearth of the home. Where mothers are honored and loved, the family is strong. And where the family is strong the nation is strong.

In recognition of the magnificent contributions of mothers to their families and to the Nation, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May of each year as Mother’s Day and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 11, 1986, be observed as Mother’s Day. I urge all Americans to express their love and honor to their mothers and to reflect on the importance of motherhood to the well-being of our country. I direct Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and tenth.

RONALD REAGAN

Proclamation 5641 – Mother’s Day, 1987
April 28, 1987
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

For more than 70 years, we Americans have set aside the second Sunday in May to honor our mothers and tell them of our love. No matter how often we express these tributes of the heart throughout the year, we choose to do so in a special way on Mother’s Day.

That is because we know and can never forget all that our mothers have given us every day, year by year, in love and courage, in toil and sacrifice, in prayer and example, in faith and forgiveness. There is no love like a mother’s—she who carries the child that God knits in the womb, she who nourishes and guides, she who teaches and inspires, she who gives of her heart and soul and self for the good and the happiness of her children and her family.

As mothers help give their families a stability rooted in love, steadfastness, devotion, and morality, they strengthen our communities and our Nation at the same time. Mother’s Day is a wonderful time for each of us to give thanks for America’s mothers and for all they mean and have meant to our country and our history. It is also a time to thank our own mothers; and whether we may do this in person still, or by loving memory, let us do it with all the love and thanks and prayer we possess.

In recognition of the contributions of mothers to their families and to our Nation, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as Mother’s Day and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 10, 1987, be observed as Mother’s Day. I urge all Americans to express their love and respect for their mothers and to reflect on the importance of motherhood to the well-being of our country. I direct government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-eighth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-seven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eleventh.

RONALD REAGAN

Proclamation 5801 – Mother’s Day, 1988
April 26, 1988
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Maternal love is the first tangible bond any human being knows. It is a tie at once physical, emotional, psychological, and mystical. With all of the words that have been written about motherhood, all of the poems of tribute and gratitude that have been penned through the ages, all of the portraits of a mother and child that have been painted down the centuries, none has come close to expressing in full the thankfulness and joy owing to mothers.

The mark of motherhood, as the story of Solomon and the disputed infant in the first Book of Kings shows, is a devotion to the well-being of the child so total that it overlooks itself and its own preferences and needs. It is a love that risks all, bears all, braves all. As it heals and strengthens and inspires in its objects an understanding of self-sacrifice and devotion, it is the parent of many another love as well.

The arms of a mother are the newborn’s first cradle and the injured child’s first refuge. The hands of a mother are the hands of care for the child who is near and of prayer for the one who is far away. The eyes of a mother are the eyes of fond surprise at baby’s first step, the eyes of unspoken worry at the young adult’s first voyage from home, the eyes of gladness at every call or visit that says she is honored and remembered. The heart of a mother is a heart that is always full.

Generation after generation has measured love by the work and wonder of motherhood. For these gifts, ever ancient and ever new, we cannot pause too often to give thanks to mothers. As inadequate as our homage may be and as short as a single day is to express it—”What possible comparison was there,” a great saint wrote of his mother, “between the honor I showed her and the service she had rendered me?”-Mother’s Day affords us an opportunity to meet one of life’s happiest duties.

In recognition of the contributions of mothers to their families and to our Nation, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as Mother’s Day and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 8, 1988, be observed as Mother’s Day. I urge all Americans to express their love and respect for their mothers and to reflect on the importance of motherhood to the well-being of our country. I direct government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-sixth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-eight, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twelfth.

RONALD REAGAN

George Bush & mother Dorothy
George Bush & mother Dorothy

Proclamation 5974 – Mother’s Day, 1989
May 10, 1989
By the President of the United States if America
A Proclamation

 

On Mother’s Day, Americans of all ages pause to express their deep gratitude and love for their mothers. Whether we do so in person, over the phone, or by honoring her memory, expressions of affection and appreciation for our mother are but a small reflection of the love and generosity she has bestowed on us.

A mother’s love, while demonstrated daily in acts of tenderness and generosity, is always a source of wonder. Who can fathom the quiet thoughts of one who keeps in her heart a constant vigil over the child she has carried in her womb, rocked in her arms, and watched grow, with eyes full of worry, joy, and pride? Her devotion never fails to fill us with gratitude and awe.

Our mother is our first teacher and greatest advocate. In her voice, we hear the reassurance or gentle reproach that helps to guide us through times of doubt and decision. In her example, we discover the meaning of unconditional love.

A mother bears her child’s pains and disappointments as if they were here own and celebrates every accomplishment as if no other child could achieve the same. She delights in every drawing of purple trees and lopsided houses fashioned in crayon by her child’s small, uncertain hand because she knows that each one reveals his blossiming awareness of the world around him. A mother also rejoices as her child grows in wisdom and responsibility, is firm in instilling moral values, yet pardons every failure along the way. Selfless and forgiving, maternal love is the closest thing on earth to the perfect love of our Creator.

Today, we honor all those women who, by virtue of giving birth, or through adoption or marriage, are mothers. Each of us should let our mother know that she is ever close in our hearts, and that her many gifts to us are cherished and remembered — not only on Mother’s Day, but throughout the year.

In recognition of the contributions of all mothers to their families and to the Nation, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as Mother’s Day and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, George Bush, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim that Sunday, May 14, 1989, be observed as Mother’s Day. I urge all Americans to express their love and respect for their mothers and to reflect on the importance of motherhood to the well-being of our country. I direct Federal officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty-nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6133 – Mother’s Day, 1990
May 10, 1990
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

For more than three-quarters of a century, we Americans have celebrated the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day. On this day, we pause to honor all those women who, by virtue of giving birth, or through marriage or adoption, are mothers.

::The mother’s heart is the child’s schoolroom,” Henry Ward Beecher once wrote. Indeed, from his or her mother a child learns important lessons about love and loyalty, patience and generosity, personal responsibility, and respect for others. Because we remember these lessons for a lifetime, and because we carry them with us as members of a larger community, our mothers help to shape the character of our Nation.

A mother is not only her little one’s first teacher, but also their first and greatest friend. Her name is often the first word a child utters; her voice is one of the sweetest sounds a child knows.

For some of us, childhood is now a precious memory, but our mothers continue to be as dear to us — perhaps ever more so, as we become more profoundly aware of the many gifts they have given us over the years. The depth of a mother’s devotion, demonstrated time and again in acts of tenderness and sacrifice, is unfathomable. Always faithful to her children, always willing to offer them reassurance and forgiveness, a mother provides a glimpse of the Divine Love that gives every human life dignity and meaning. This may well be our mother’s greatest gift to us.

Shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the beginning of our Nation’s involvement in World War II, and American minister noted that Mother’s Day held special significance for a nation embroiled in bitter conflict. He wrote: “We are so grateful that on this beautiful day it is possible for the heart and soul of America to unite itself, irrespective of creed or color, of faith or race, into one great effort to bring this ideal of love before our hearts and minds again.” At a time when the power of hatred seemed overwhelming, the unfailing strength of maternal love gave reason to believe that goodness would prevail.

Today we no longer face the cruel test of world war, but we still do well to reflect upon the example provided by our mothers. Their courage, faithfulness, and generosity must never fail to strengthen and inspire us.

In grateful recognition of the contributions of all mothers to their families and to the Nationa, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, George Bush, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim that Sunday, May 13, 1990, be observed as Mother’s Day. I urge all Americans to express their love and respect for their mothers and to reflect upon the importance of motherhood to the well-being of our country. I direct Federal officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fourteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6187 – Gold Star Mother’s Day, 1990
September 26, 1990
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Few Americans could have a more profound understanding of the price of freedom than our Nation’s Gold Star Mothers. These proud and courageous women are the mothers of U.S. military personnel who have perished in the line of duty.

Anyone who has been blessed with children knows that there is no greater heartache than losing a son or daughter. The mothers of those brave and selfless Americans who have died to defend the lives and liberty of others have suffered greatly, yet they have also inspired us with their unfailing faith and patriotism. These women, known as Gold Star Mothers, merit our lasting respect and gratitude.

In his now-famous letter to Mrs. Lydia Bixby, a Boston widow who was reported to have lost several sons during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln wrote: I feel how weak and fruitless must be any words of mine which should attempt to beguile you from the grief of a loss so overwhelming, but I cannot refrain from tendering to you the consolation that may be found in the thanks of the Republic that they died to save. I pray that the Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of freedom.

The American Gold Star Mothers have likewise made an enormous sacrifice for our country, and, on this occasion, we echo President Lincoln’s timeless appeal.

Whether they made their final stand for liberty and justice on the beaches of Normandy during World War II, on the harsh terrain of Korea and Vietnam, or, more recently, in places such as Grenada, Lebanon, Panama, and the Persian Gulf region, those heroic Americans who have died while defending the cause of peace and freedom will never be forgotten. To the women who nurtured in them a love of God and country, as well as a sense of duty and concern for others, we offer a heartfelt salute.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 115 (June 23, 1936), designated the last Sunday in September as “Gold Star Mother’s Day” and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this occasion.

Now, Therefore, I, George Bush, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim September 30, 1990, as Gold Star Mother’s Day. I call upon all government officials to display the United States flag on government buildings on this day. I also urge the people of the United States to display the flag and to hold appropriate meetings in their homes, churches, synagogues, or other suitable places, as a public expression of the love, sorrow, and reverence that our Nation holds for American Gold Star Mothers.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-sixth day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fifteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6279 – Mother’s Day, 1991
April 23, 1991
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The beloved American humorist, Will Rogers, once said, “Mothers are the only race of people that speak the same tongue. A mother in Manchuria could converse with a mother in Nebraska and never miss a word.” It was a remark made with the wry, good-natured wit that was Rogers’ trademark. Yet beneath his lighthearted humor was a telling observation about human nature — and about the nature of motherhood in particular.

The language of motherhood is indeed universal. It is the language of unconditional love, spoken throughout history by mothers of every race and every walk of life. Expressed most often through acts of selflessness and generosity, that great love can be read in a mother’s eyes, which reveal untold depths of tenderness, worry, and pride in her children. It can be heard in her voice as she soothes a crying infant, as she gives instruction and encouragement to an older child, and as she inquires about the well-being of the young adult who has ventured out on his or her own. Most of all, that great love is communicated by example.

In the silent language of motherhood, any two mothers may offer each other empathy and reassurance just by exchanging a knowing glance or smile. Yet while the language of motherhood is universal, it is also profoundly intimate, as personal and mysterious as the bond between a woman and the child she has carried in her womb. We seldom understand the depth of a parent’s love until we have youngsters of our own — then our mother’s lessons and example speak to us with renewed clarity and meaning. Indeed, her words often echo in our hearts as we rear our own children and experience for ourselves the singular joys, frustrations, and concerns that have always been a part of parenting. As we advance in years, we also begin to recognize the extent of our mother’s influence upon our character and conduct; reflecting on her many gifts to us — from her firm moral guidance and discipline to her patience and forgiveness — we begin to comprehend the truth that led Abraham Lincoln to declare: “No man is poor who has had a godly mother.”

With love of untold strength, mothers nourish and enrich the lives of their children and fortify the tender bonds of family life. In so doing, they also strengthen our communities and Nation. Thus, on this occasion, we gratefully honor all those women who, by virtue of giving birth or through adoption or marriage, are mothers.

On this day especially and on every day of the year, let us convey through word and deed our love for our mothers and our appreciation for all that they have given us. Whether we share those heartfelt sentiments in person, across the miles, or through loving memory, we cannot say too often: “Thanks, Mom, for everything.”

In grateful recognition of the contributions that mothers make to their families and to the Nation, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, George Bush, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim that Sunday, May 12, 1991, be observed as Mother’s Day. I urge all Americans to express their love and respect for their mothers on this day; to reflect upon the importance of motherhood to our families and Nation; and to ask for God’s blessing upon both. I also direct Federal officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal buildings, and I encourage all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 23 day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fifteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6331 – Gold Star Mother’s Day, 1991
September 4, 1991
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

We Americans can never forget the brave and selfless individuals who have given their lives for our country. Indeed, this year alone has given us several poignant reminders of the debt that we owe to each of them. While the 200th anniversary of our Bill of Rights has renewed our appreciation for the blessings of liberty, the war in the Persian Gulf has deepened our gratitude toward those who have died to win them. On this occasion, however, we honor the mothers of our Nation’s fallen. Known as Gold Star Mothers, these women have shared in the sacrifices of their children, and they deserve a commensurate portion of our respect and thanks.

Any parent who has ever suffered the loss of a son or daughter knows that when that child dies, a part of oneself dies too. Accordingly, our Nation’s Gold Star Mothers understand the value of liberty because they have borne part of the price that has been paid to defend it. Today many Gold Star Mothers are demonstrating their enduring love of freedom through generous voluntary efforts in their communities — including special efforts in behalf of veterans and active duty service members.

Although we set aside this day in their honor, let us pay tribute to our Nation’s Gold Star Mothers throughout the year by assuring them — through word and deed — that their children’s sacrifices are remembered and appreciated. Let us continue working to promote respect for human rights and the rule of law around the world, and let us pray for lasting peace among nations, so that no more Americans might die in battle, and so that no more mothers might face war’s bereavement.

The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 115 (June 23, 1936), designated the last Sunday in September as “Gold Star Mother’s Day” and authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this day.

Now, Therefore, I, George Bush, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim September 29, 1991, as Gold Star Mother’s Day. I call on all government officials to display the United States flag on government buildings on this day. I also urge the American people to display the flag and to hold appropriate meetings in their homes, places of worship, or other suitable places, as a public expression of the sympathy and the respect that our Nation holds for its Gold Star Mothers.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and sixteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Proclamation 6430 – Mother’s Day, 1992
May 8, 1992
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

When we Americans observed a National Day of Prayer earlier this week, we not only gave thanks for our many blessings but also prayed for the renewal of our Nation’s moral heritage, beginning with that most precious and important of institutions: the family. It seems fitting, therefore, that we observe Mother’s Day while those prayers still echo in our thoughts. A mother is the heart of the family and the light of the home, and the love and values that she imparts to her children profoundly influence the character of our communities and country.

“All that I am,” said John Quincy Adams, “my mother made me.” Who of us could not say likewise? A mother is her child’s first and most influential teacher, and the lessons that one learns through her love and example last a lifetime. Ranging from simple lessons about courtesy and kindness to poignant lessons about duty, honor, patience, and forgiveness, they guide us even as we rear children of our own. Indeed, the older we become, the more deeply we appreciate our mother’s wisdom — as well as the many worries and sacrifices that she has endured for our sake.

Today, as we honor all women who, by virtue of giving birth or through marriage or adoption, are mothers, we remember especially those who — despite even the most difficult social and economic circumstances — help their children to grow in love of God and neighbor and in understanding of the difference between right and wrong. Through their faith and courage, and through the unconditional love and acceptance that are the mark of motherhood, these women give their children hope, self-esteem, and direction. In so doing, they give them keys to a brighter future.

In grateful recognition of the contributions that mothers everywhere make to their families and to the Nation, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 771), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, George Bush, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim that Sunday, May 10, 1992, be observed as Mother’s Day. I urge all Americans to express their love and respect for their mothers on this day; to reflect on the importance of motherhood to our families and Nation; and to ask for God’s blessing upon each. I also direct Federal officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal buildings, and I encourage all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and sixteenth.

GEORGE BUSH

Bill Clinton & mother Virginia
Bill Clinton & mother Virginia

Proclamation 6559 – Mother’s Day, 1993
May 7, 1993
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

 

For more than half a century, Americans have celebrated Mother’s Day on the second Sunday in May. On this day, we honor our mothers and reflect on the many hours of love and care they have devoted to our lives.

Mothers are the cornerstone of our communities. As caregivers, community activists, teachers, leaders, and business professionals, they serve as role models and inspirations for our achievements. Their tireless devotion to the family nourishes us as individuals and enriches our Nation.

Throughout life, a mother is a teacher, a nurturer, a supporter, and a source of strength. Our mothers instill in us strong values and the confidence to dream big dreams. With their encouragement and support, we can pursue our dreams and make them come true.

Mothers enrich our lives in so many ways. Whether biological, foster, or adoptive, a mother holds an enduring place in our hearts; a mother’s love transcends all differences and divisions. We admire the energy, strength, and conviction of our mothers, and we honor their dedication to helping others. As we celebrate Mother’s Day, let us cherish their gifts of selflessness and love.

In recognition of the contributions of all mothers to their children and to the Nation, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, William J. Clinton, President of the United States of America, do hereby request that Sunday, May 9, 1993, be observed as Mother’s Day. I direct Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Federal Government buildings, and I urge all citizens to display the flag at their homes and other suitable places on that day.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and seventeenth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

Proclamation 6683 – Mother’s Day, 1994
May 5, 1994
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

With the signing of the first Mother’s Day Proclamation 80 years ago, President Woodrow Wilson set aside the second Sunday in May as a special time to pay tribute to America’s mothers. This year I join with Americans across this great land on May 8, 1994, to honor our mothers with the appreciation and affection they so richly deserve.

Indisputably, the role of mothers has changed greatly in the last half-century. They are bread makers and breadwinners, heads of households and heads of state, caretakers of elderly parents and of newborn infants. They are also volunteers in our communities, schools, and religious organizations. Mothers find time to inspire and challenge their children to dream big dreams and to do good deeds. They provide encouragement to their children to reach for the stars and to strive for excellence. When our mothers succeed, our children succeed. When children succeed, our Nation’s future is assured.

Mothers are not only our life-givers, but they are also our nurturers who sustain us with deep and unconditional love. In a world of constant change, they establish a reliable foundation of unchanging values. By instilling strong moral principles and showing concern for social improvement and well-being, mothers have used their talents, ideals, and energies to shape our families, communities, and Nation. For their abiding devotion, love, patience, and loyalty, mothers, whether biological, foster, or adoptive, hold an enduring place in our hearts. They are anchors of their American families—our Nation’s most important source of strength. My own mother’s courage and determination profoundly influenced me in so many ways, and she will always remain a guiding force throughout my life.

Mother’s Day gives us time to pause and reflect on the manner in which mothers contribute to their families and the Nation through their hard work, dedication, and daily sacrifices. We can best observe Mother’s Day by expressing our thanks and our gratitude for the blessings and bounties that motherhood holds.

Now, Therefore, I, William J. Clinton, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Sunday, May 8, 1994, as “Mother’s Day.” I urge all Americans to express their love and respect for their mothers and to consider how much they have contributed to the well-being of our country. I call upon all citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this

fifth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and eighteenth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

Proclamation 6797 – Mother’s Day, 1995
May 11, 1995
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Each year, Americans pause on the second Sunday of May to celebrate the gift of motherhood. Mother’s Day reminds all of us to honor our mothers and to show them our love and appreciation—on this day and throughout the year. Whether we embrace our mothers in person or hold fast to a loving memory, the strength of their spirit and the blessing of their compassion stay with us for a lifetime.

Americans’ vitality as a people flows from the health of our families. The heart and soul of our national life, mothers rise each day to take on myriad tasks, from driving a carpool to directing a city council. They are an anchor to generations past and a bridge to the world of the future. Meeting the challenge of motherhood is one of society’s greatest responsibilities, and those who do this work every day do a service to all humanity.

Whether biological, foster, or adoptive, mothers have a unique ability to caution and care for their children and to instill in them the values of honesty, respect, and faith. As role models for their children, mothers show by example the infinite possibilities of life.

No matter our age, our mothers are ready to understand, to love, and to listen. We best observe this special day by living our lives to reflect the love they have given us and by teaching our children to hope for a brighter tomorrow.

To honor all mothers and their special place in our hearts, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, William J. Clinton, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Sunday, May 14, 1995, as “Mother’s Day.” I urge all Americans to consider how much mothers have contributed to the well-being of our Nation. I call upon our citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety-five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and nineteenth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

Proclamation 6893 – Mother’s Day, 1996
May 7, 1996
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

America’s mothers hold a special place in our hearts, providing the lessons and care that have enabled generations of children to embrace the opportunities of this great land. They embody the compassion, devotion, and energy that have always defined our national character, and their daily efforts anchor our country’s commitment to the fundamental values of respect and tolerance. Mothers impart both the strength that enables us to face our challenges and the love that comforts and sustains us.

As we honor our Nation’s mothers for past and present accomplishments, we recognize that mothers’ roles have changed significantly in recent years. Today, mothers are CEOs and teachers, physicians and nurses, elected officials and PTA presidents, police officers and volunteers, homemakers and heads of households. Many serve on the front lines of the struggle against violence and poverty. These women—problem-solvers, caregivers, and teachers—are using their talents in every sector of our society, helping all Americans to look forward with hope and faith in the future.

Mother’s Day has long been a welcome opportunity to celebrate motherhood and to remember our mothers—whether biological, foster, or adoptive. To reflect on all we have gained from our mothers’ guidance and to remember their sacrifices, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, William J. Clinton, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 12, 1996, as Mother’s Day. I urge all Americans to express their gratitude for the many contributions made by our mothers and to observe this day with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety-six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twentieth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

Proclamation 6999 – Mother’s Day, 1997
May 7, 1997
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

As we prepare to enter the 21st century, in the midst of a rapidly changing world, one thing remains constant—the unconditional love between a mother and her child. This love provides us with a cornerstone and sanctuary throughout our entire lives. Mothers nurture, challenge, and instill strong values in their children, find solutions, arbitrate disputes, organize activities, care and teach, influence and lead, give, share, and encourage. Their abiding moral principles shape our families, our communities, and our national life.

Today, mothers face many different challenges—from balancing the responsibilities of home and work, to raising families on their own—while contending with the often daunting challenges of modern society. They do this all while meeting the day-to-day responsibilities of class projects, car payments, and the flu season. And yet, they succeed, determined to protect what is so precious to them and to make brighter futures for themselves, their children, and their Nation.

Each year we welcome the opportunity to set aside a day to acknowledge all that our mothers—whether biological, adoptive, or foster—have given us. It is a time to reflect on all we have gained from their guidance, care, and sacrifice and a time to openly express our gratitude and love. The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, William J. Clinton, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 11, 1997, as Mother’s Day. Whether we are able to share this special day with our mothers or are blessed with memories of them, in our hearts they are with us always. I urge all Americans to express their love and respect for their mothers and to observe this day with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety-seven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-first.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

Proclamation 7093 – Mother’s Day, 1998
May 7, 1998
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Mothers are the heart of our families and the soul of our society. They are the nurturers of life, our teachers, confidants, counselors, and lifelong friends. They believe in our dreams and help us to achieve them. They help us develop the values, self-esteem, strength of character, and generosity of spirit we need to embrace the wider world beyond the family. Above all, mothers provide us with the blessing of their love.

While this special love between mother and child is unchanging, the challenges of motherhood are not. The role of women in our society has changed dramatically during the past century. Millions of American women today pursue full-time careers in addition to carrying out their duties as parents, balancing family, job, and community responsibilities. Whether they stay home with their children or become working mothers, mothers today care for their families and meet the new demands of our complex society with strength, courage, and quiet selflessness. On Mother’s Day, let us honor all mothers—biological or adoptive, foster or stepmother—whose unconditional love has strengthened us and whose many gifts have graced our lives.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, William J. Clinton, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 10, 1998, as Mother’s Day. I urge all Americans to express their love, respect, and appreciation for the contributions mothers have made to all of us, and I call upon all citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety-eight, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-second.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

Proclamation 7193 – Mother’s Day 1999
May 5, 1999
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

There is nothing more precious than the bond between a mother and her child. With unconditional love and infinite patience, our mothers nurture us throughout our lives, helping us to meet life’s challenges and achieve our dreams. Mothers—whether biological or adoptive, foster or stepmothers—are the cornerstones of our families, and our families are the foundation of our Nation. Mothers are the bridges that link America’s best promise to its brightest reality.

The role of women has changed dramatically in the last half-century, bringing exciting new opportunities as well as fresh challenges. Today, our mothers can be mayors and managers, heads of households and homemakers—yet they still make us the center of their lives and the focus of their love. Regardless of whether they work inside or outside the home, we still turn to our mothers when we need reassurance, advice, or comfort. Devotion and love, loyalty and selflessness—these are the traits that define motherhood.

For 85 years, we have reserved the second Sunday in May as a special day to honor our mothers for their strength, nobility, and generosity. In so many ways, we owe our successes—and those of our Nation—to the loving influence of our mothers. Although we can never repay them for their gift of life and love, we can honor them in person or cherish their beloved memory. The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May of each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, William J. Clinton, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 9, 1999, as Mother’s Day. I urge all Americans to express their love and appreciation for their mothers on this day and every day and to observe the day with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and ninety-nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-third.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

Proclamation 7305 – Mother’s Day, 2000
May 10, 2000
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

We are living in a new century and a new age, where the revolution in communications technology is changing almost every aspect of human experience. But even in this new era of global connections, there is perhaps no more powerful link than the love between mother and child.

That bond is a child’s first experience of the world, and that love is often the deepest source of the self-esteem, courage, and character that children need to thrive. Mothers are their children’s first teachers; they are their inspiring role models whose generosity, compassion, and unconditional acceptance give children the strength and encouragement to reach their fullest potential and to make their own contributions to their families, communities, and country.

Even in this age of spectacular technological advances, mothers still face the daunting challenges of balancing the responsibilities of home and work and meeting the changing emotional, educational, and physical needs of their children. Mothers strive to provide a safe and nurturing environment. They help their children navigate the often stormy waters of an increasingly complicated world. They teach their children to approach conflict with words, not violence; to cherish the richness of our diversity and reject prejudice in any form; and to believe in themselves.

Each year we set aside this special day to acknowledge all that our mothers–whether biological or foster, adoptive or stepmothers–have given us. It is a time to reflect on all we have gained from their unwavering care, guidance, and sacrifice, and a time to express openly our deep gratitude and abiding love. The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May of each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, William J. Clinton, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 14, 2000, as Mother’s Day. Whether we are able to share this special day with our mothers in person or are blessed only with our memories of their love, in our hearts they remain with us always. I urge all Americans to express their love and respect for their mothers on this day, to speak the words of appreciation we too often neglect to say, and to observe this day with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

Bush jr mother
George W. Bush & mother Barbara

Proclamation 7437–Mother’s Day, 2001
May 9, 2001
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

No matter what direction life takes us, a mother’s love and guidance are a tremendous blessing that help us to grow up as stable, responsible, and caring individuals. As nurturers, teachers, and protectors, mothers’ unconditional affection helps their children to blossom into mature adults. In partnership with fathers, mothers play a critical role in building healthy families.

Anna M. Jarvis is credited with influencing the Congress in 1914 to establish an official Mother’s Day as a tribute to her beloved mother and to all mothers. She conceived of the day as a time when children could formally demonstrate respect for their mothers and reinforce family bonds.

Mothers who teach us right from wrong and to love our neighbors merit our deepest gratitude and appreciation. Beyond their more traditional role in rearing children, many mothers also face responsibilities outside the home as members of the workforce. At the same time, they may be caring not only for their biological or adopted children but also for stepchildren or foster children.

Many American families are now headed solely by women, and these women shoulder enormous responsibilities. For the good of their families and our Nation, we must strive to provide support and assistance to those mothers, such as, opportunities for training and employment; early childhood education for their young ones; and safe, affordable, and high-quality childcare. But fathers must also remain committed and involved in the lives of their children. By fulfilling their financial and nurturing responsibilities, fathers help ensure the well-being of their children and ease the burden on those women who carry the primary responsibility of caring for their families.

Whatever their circumstances, mothers demonstrate daily how their devotion, strength, and wisdom make all the difference in the lives of their children. To honor mothers, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, George W. Bush, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 13, 2001, as Mother’s Day. I encourage all Americans to honor the importance of mothers and to celebrate how their love and devotion are crucial to the well-being of children, families, and our society.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proclamation 7557 – Mother’s Day, 2002
May 9, 2002
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Mothers are central to the success of the American family. Their love, dedication, and wisdom touch countless lives every day in every community throughout our land. And their love and guidance of children help to develop healthy and spiritually sound families.

President John Quincy Adams once said, “All that I am my mother made me.” President Abraham Lincoln believed, “All that I am or hope to be I owe to my angel mother. I remember my mother’s prayers and they have always followed me. They have clung to me all my life.” These statements are just as true for the millions of Americans who credit their mothers for helping to successfully shape their lives.

Millions of American mothers are at work in communities across the United States, improving the lives of their families and their neighbors through countless acts of thoughtful kindness. They energize, inspire, and effect change in homes, schools, governments, and businesses throughout our country. By their example, mothers teach their children that serving others is the greatest gift they can give.

Nearly 100 years ago, Anna Jarvis of Philadelphia helped establish the first official Mother’s Day observance. Her campaign to organize such a holiday began as a remembrance of her late mother, who, in the aftermath of the Civil War, had tried to establish “Mother’s Friendship Days” as a way to bring unity and reconciliation to our Nation. In 1910, West Virginia became the first State officially to observe Mother’s Day. The idea caught on quickly; for just over a year later, nearly every State in the Union had officially recognized the day. In 1914, President Woodrow Wilson issued the first Mother’s Day proclamation, stating that the observance serves as a “public expression of our love and reverence for the mothers of our country.”

On this special day and throughout the year, our mothers deserve our greatest respect and deepest appreciation for their love and sacrifice. I especially commend foster mothers for answering my call to service, volunteering their time and their hearts to aid children in need of a mother’s love. To honor mothers, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, as amended (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May as “Mother’s Day” and has requested the President to call for its appropriate observance, which, as the son of a fabulous mother, I am pleased and honored to do again this year.

Now, Therefore, I, George W. Bush, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 12, 2002, as Mother’s Day. I encourage all Americans to express their love, respect, and gratitude to mothers everywhere for their remarkable contributions to their children, families, communities, and our Nation.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proclamation 7674 – Mother’s Day, 2003
May 7, 2003
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

On Mother’s Day, we honor the dedicated and caring women who are devoted to their families and committed to improving the world their children will inherit. Our first President, George Washington, said that his mother was “the most beautiful woman I ever saw. All I am I owe to my mother.” America owes much of its goodness and strength to mothers, including adoptive mothers, stepmothers, and foster mothers.

Mother’s Day began as a day of love and friendship, designed to help heal families divided across battle lines during the Civil War. In 1914, President Woodrow Wilson signed a resolution officially establishing Mother’s Day to honor the role of women in the family. On Mother’s Day, 2003, we carry on the tradition by recognizing our mothers for their strength and compassion. We also recognize them for showing unconditional love and teaching positive values.

Mothers nurture a child’s physical and emotional growth, nurse illness, ease failure, and cheer success. They instill important values in children and help provide the tools they need to make the right choices and grow up to be responsible, compassionate, and successful members of society.

As we honor our mothers on this special day, we celebrate their contributions to the character of our next generation of leaders. And we remember the lessons our mothers have taught us: That it is better to give than to receive, that we must love our neighbors as ourselves, and that service to others brings joy.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, as amended (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and has requested the President to call for its appropriate observance. It is my honor and privilege to do so again.

Now, Therefore, I, George W. Bush, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 11, 2003, as Mother’s Day. I encourage all Americans to express their love, respect, and appreciation to mothers everywhere for their contributions to their children, families, communities, and our Nation. I also call upon citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-seventh.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proclamation 7783 – Mother’s Day, 2004
May 7, 2004
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

President Theodore Roosevelt once said, “The mother is the one supreme asset of national life; she is more important by far than the successful statesman, or business man, or artist, or scientist.” Today, mothers continue to be an important part of our national character. On Mother’s Day, we honor the women whose steadfast love and wisdom have made America a better place.

During the Civil War, Julia Ward Howe, author of “The Battle Hymn of the Republic,” proposed renaming July 4 as Mother’s Day and a day dedicated to peace. Anna Reeves Jarvis also began working for a similar holiday and sponsored a Mother’s Friendship Day in her hometown to reunite families divided by the war. It was not until 2 years after her mother’s death that her daughter, Anna M. Jarvis, started the campaign for the observance of Mother’s Day in the United States. By 1911, Mother’s Day was observed in nearly every State of the Union, and in 1914, responding to a joint resolution of the Congress, President Woodrow Wilson officially designated Mother’s Day a national observance.

Motherhood is a rewarding and often difficult job. A mother is a child’s first teacher and affects a child’s life like few others can. Effective mothers can inspire their sons and daughters to love themselves and others, work hard, make healthy choices, serve causes greater than self, and achieve their dreams. Mothers who protect, teach, and nurture their children with all their hearts strengthen their families and help build a better future for our country.

This Mother’s Day, we express our heartfelt thanks to our mothers for their unconditional love and guidance. We take time to recognize the many mothers who are supporting their brave sons and daughters in the Armed Forces, and the many others who are themselves serving proudly in defense of America’s freedom and security. The service and sacrifice of these women reflect the best of our Nation. They and their loved ones are in our thoughts and prayers.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, as amended (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and has requested the President to call for its appropriate observance. In honor of all of our Nation’s mothers, I am pleased to do so.

Now, Therefore, I, George W. Bush, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 9, 2004, as Mother’s Day. I commend mothers for the important contributions they make to our society and encourage all Americans to express their love, gratitude, and respect for mothers, and to honor their mothers on this day and throughout the year.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-eighth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proclamation 7897 – Mother’s Day, 2005
May 5, 2005
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

On Mother’s Day, we pay tribute to the extraordinary women whose guidance and unconditional love shape our lives and our future. Motherhood often allows little time for rest. As President Theodore Roosevelt said of the American mother in 1905, “Upon her time and strength, demands are made not only every hour of the day but often every hour of the night.” President Roosevelt’s words ring as true today as they did 100 years ago.

The hard, perpetual work of motherhood shows us that a single soul can make a difference in a young person’s future. As sources of hope, stability, and love, mothers teach young people to honor the values that sustain a free society. By raising children to be responsible citizens, mothers serve a cause larger than themselves and strengthen communities across our great Nation.

Mothers are tireless advocates for children. In our schools, mothers help to ensure that every child reaches his or her full potential. In our communities, they set an example by reaching out to those who are lost and offering love to those who hurt. A mother’s caring presence helps children to resist peer pressure, focus on making the right choices, and realize their promise and potential.

In an hour of testing, one person can show the compassion and character of a whole country. In supporting their sons and daughters as they grow and learn, mothers bring care and hope into others’lives and make our Nation a more just, compassionate, and loving place.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, as amended (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and has requested the President to call for its appropriate observance. It is my honor to do so. May God bless mothers across our great land on this special day.

Now, Therefore, I, George W. Bush, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 8, 2005, as Mother’s Day. I encourage all Americans to express their love, appreciation, and admiration to mothers for making a difference in the lives of their children, families, and communities. I also call upon citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand five, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-ninth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proclamation 8013 – Mother’s Day, 2006
May 4, 2006
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

On Mother’s Day, we honor our mothers and pay tribute to their devoted work and selfless gift of love.

America’s mothers are women of determination and vision. They serve as caregivers and guides, helping to build the foundation for our children’s success and nurturing them as they grow and explore the great promise of our Nation. Through their mothers’ examples, children come to understand the virtue of kindness, the blessing of compassion, and the importance of principle. A mother’s support encourages children to make right choices, set high goals, and become good citizens. A mother’s love inspires children to achieve their full potential and strengthens the character of our country. The commitment and love of mothers reflect the best of America.

On this special day, we remember the many mothers whose sons and daughters serve in harm’s way. The determination and courage of these women demonstrate the spirit of our Nation, and America will always be grateful for their unfailing devotion. We also recognize the dedication of the many mothers who serve in America’s Armed Forces. These brave women protect the safety and security of our Nation and help ensure a peaceful future for our children.

To honor mothers, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, as amended (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and has requested the President to call for its appropriate observance. May God bless all mothers across our country on this special day, and throughout the year.

Now, Therefore, I, George W. Bush, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 14, 2006, as Mother’s Day. I encourage all Americans to show their gratitude and love to mothers for making a difference in the lives of their children and communities. I call upon citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand six, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirtieth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proclamation 8140 – Mother’s Day, 2007
May 7, 2007
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Motherhood is one of the most cherished and valued roles in our society. On Mother’s Day, we pay tribute to these dedicated women who give unconditional love and guidance to their children.

A mother’s work requires extraordinary patience and compassion, and her example influences the formation of young lives. President Gerald Ford wrote that “there is no undertaking more challenging, no responsibility more awesome, than that of being a mother.” Mothers make great sacrifices and serve as caregivers and role models to help their children embrace dreams and aspirations. From these remarkable women, children learn character and values, the importance of giving back to their communities, and the courage to realize their potential. Mothers of military personnel provide support and encouragement while their sons and daughters defend our freedom in places far from home, and many mothers bring honor to the uniform of the United States while working to lay the foundations of peace for generations to come.

The bond between mothers and their children is one defined by love. As a mother’s prayers for her children are unending, so are the wisdom, grace, and strength they provide to their children. On Mother’s Day, we are reminded of the great debt we owe to our Nation’s mothers for their love and devotion to their sacred duty.

To honor mothers, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, as amended (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and has requested the President to call for its appropriate observance. Throughout the year, and especially on this day, America’s sons and daughters honor our mothers and celebrate their selfless gift of love.

Now, Therefore, I, George W. Bush, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 13, 2007, as Mother’s Day. I encourage all Americans to show their gratitude and love to mothers for making a difference in the lives of their children, families, and communities. I call upon citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand seven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-first.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proclamation 8253 – Mother’s Day, 2008
May 8, 2008
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

On Mother’s Day, we honor the grace, wisdom, and strength of our mothers, and we celebrate the special bonds shared between mothers and their children.

Mothers work tirelessly to help their children build healthy and successful lives. Through their positive examples and countless acts of kindness, mothers teach the values of generosity and compassion and the importance of family and community. As President Ronald Reagan said, “From our mothers, we first learn about values and caring and the difference between right and wrong.” By providing a nurturing environment where their children can grow in confidence and character, mothers lay the foundation for the next generation of Americans to realize their full potential.

Our Nation is grateful for the sacrifices mothers make every day and for the unconditional love they give their children. We are especially thankful for the mothers who support their sons and daughters serving in our Armed Forces and for the mothers who bring honor to the uniform of the United States by defending our freedom at home and abroad.

Every child blessed with a mother’s love has been given one of life’s great gifts. On this Mother’s Day, we recognize the extraordinary contributions America’s mothers make to their children, their families, and our country.

To honor mothers, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, as amended (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and has requested the President to call for its appropriate observance. May God bless mothers across America on this special day and throughout the year.

Now, Therefore, I, George W. Bush, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 11, 2008, as Mother’s Day. I encourage all Americans to show their gratitude and love to mothers for making a difference in the lives of their children, families, and communities. I call upon citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand eight, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-second.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Barack Obama & mother Ann
Barack Obama & mother Ann

Proclamation 8376 – Mother’s Day, 2009
May 8, 2009
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

 

The time-honored tradition of recognizing mothers grew out of the imagination of a few bold women. Julia Ward Howe, composer of The Battle Hymn of the Republic, urged mothers to advocate for peace through a day dedicated to them. After her own mother passed away, Anna Jarvis sought to recognize the great influence mothers have on society. These efforts led to the recognition of mothers through a Congressional Resolution and President Woodrow Wilson’s proclamation of the first Mother’s Day in 1914. Today, we proudly carry forward this tradition in honor of mothers, the special women whose love and lessons profoundly impact our lives.

Mothers are the bedrock of the American family—vital to their children’s growth and happiness and to the success of our country. Children’s lives are shaped by their mothers, whose care provides the foundation for their development. Mothers instill the values and confidence that help define their children’s character and self-esteem, and offer a guiding clarity of spirit. Mothers are role models, teachers, and sources of unconditional support. There is no substitute for the bond of love between mother and child, and nothing is more worthy of reverence.

Across America, mothers raise children under an array of circumstances. They may care for a child with the help of a spouse, family members, and friends, or they may do this job alone as a single parent. They may be biological mothers, adoptive mothers, or foster mothers, but all open their hearts to their children and nurture them through their life journey. Caring for children also means putting food on the table, ensuring their needs are met, and staying involved in their daily lives. Women often work long hours at demanding jobs and then return home to a household with myriad demands. Balancing work and family is no easy task, but mothers across our Nation meet this challenge each day, often without recognition for their hard work and dedication. The strength and conviction of all mothers—including those who work inside and outside the home—are inspiring. They deserve our deepest respect, admiration, and appreciation.

A mother’s love is a cherished blessing, for it is selfless, unconditional, and true. This Mother’s Day, let us honor our mothers who continue to inspire us, and remember those whose loving spirits sustain us still.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Barack Obama, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 10, 2009, as Mother’s Day. I urge all Americans to express their love, respect, and gratitude to mothers everywhere, and I call upon all citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-third.

BARACK OBAMA

Proclamation 8517 – Mother’s Day, 2010
May 7, 2010
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Generations of mothers have labored tirelessly and selflessly to support and guide their children and families. Their loving, devoted efforts have broadened horizons for their children and opened doors of opportunity for our Nation’s daughters and granddaughters. On Mother’s Day, we pay tribute to these women who have given so much of themselves to lift up our children and shape America’s character.

Julia Ward Howe, who wrote the words for the song The Battle Hymn of the Republic, led early efforts to establish a day honoring the influence of mothers on our lives and communities. In the ensuing decades, many Americans rallied to support this cause, including Anna Jarvis. After the loss of her own mother, Anna helped spur the nationwide institution of Mother’s Day we celebrate each year.

From our first moments in this world and throughout our lives, our mothers protect us from harm, nurture our spirits, and encourage us to reach for our highest aspirations. Through their unwavering commitment, they have driven and inspired countless acts of leadership, compassion, and service across our country. Many mothers have struggled to raise children while pursuing their careers, or as single parents working to provide for their families. They have carried the torch of trailblazers past, leading by powerful example and overcoming obstacles so their sons and daughters could reach their fullest potential.

Whether adoptive, biological, or foster, mothers share an unbreakable bond with their children, and Americans of all ages and backgrounds owe them an immeasurable debt. Nurturing families come in many forms, and children may be raised by two parents, a single mother, two mothers, a step-mom, a grandmother, or a guardian. Mother’s Day gives us an opportunity to celebrate these extraordinary caretakers, mentors, and providers who have made us who we are. As we honor today’s mothers, we also reflect upon the memory of those who have passed, and we renew our commitment to living the values they cultivated in us.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Barack Obama, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 9, 2010, as Mother’s Day. Let us express our deepest love and thanks to our mothers and remember those who, though no longer with us, inspire us still.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand ten, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth.

BARACK OBAMA

Proclamation 8671 – Mother’s Day, 2011
May 6, 2011
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

As our society has changed, so have the challenges facing women raising families. Many American women are raising children at home while caring for an elderly parent, holding down two jobs, serving as the sole parent in a family, or defending our country overseas as a service member. Our Nation’s mothers not only look after our needs and teach us to be compassionate and responsible, but also manage households, build careers, and improve our neighborhoods and communities. While the roles and responsibilities of mothers have evolved, their guidance and care remains as strong and constant as ever.

On Mother’s Day, we celebrate the extraordinary importance of mothers in our lives. The bond of love and dedication a mother shares with her children and family is without bounds or conditions. Whether an adoptive mom or grandmother, mother or partner, the women who raise us show us that no hurdle is too high, and no dream is beyond our reach. As sons and daughters, we show our gratitude for the women in our lives who care for us, shape our values, and set us on the path to a limitless future.

Throughout our history, mothers have made remarkable sacrifices for the well-being of their loved ones. Nearly a century ago, Anna Jarvis, who had suffered the loss of her beloved mother, campaigned with many other Americans to make Mother’s Day a recognized holiday and pay respect to all women raising children. Today, we continue to celebrate the influence, love, and nurturing our mothers provide in our lives and in our national life.

To support the parents who are raising tomorrow’s leaders, my Administration is committed to doing all we can to create jobs and economic opportunities for families across America. We are striving to help mothers in the workplace by enforcing equal pay laws and addressing workplace flexibility as families balance the demands of work, child and elder care, and education. My budget strengthens the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit to help families afford the cost of quality childcare. The tax-cut package we passed last December extended expansions of the Child Tax Credit and Earned Income Tax Credit, providing a tax cut for 15.7 million families with about 29.1 million children. The Affordable Care Act gives women more access to health care and better resources to protect the health of their families by requiring new insurance plans to cover wellness benefits for children, ending the exclusion of pre-existing conditions by insurance companies, and extending parents’ health coverage for young adults up to age 26. First Lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move!” initiative is also providing mothers with helpful tools to support their children’s healthy growth.

Mothers are the rocks of our families and a foundation in our communities. In gratitude for their generous love, patient counsel, and lifelong support, let us pay respect to the women who carry out the hard work of motherhood with skill and grace, and let us remember those mothers who, though no longer with us, inspire us still.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914, (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Barack Obama, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 8, 2011, as Mother’s Day. I urge all Americans to express their love, respect, and gratitude to mothers everywhere, and I call upon all citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand eleven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth.

BARACK OBAMA

Proclamation 8817 – Mother’s Day, 2012
May 11, 2012
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Mothers are cornerstones of our families and our communities. On Mother’s Day, we honor the remarkable women who strive and sacrifice every day to ensure their children have every opportunity to pursue their dreams.

Our Nation first came together to celebrate Mother’s Day on May 11, 1913, with the introduction of a House Resolution requesting President Woodrow Wilson, Members of Congress, and officials across the Federal Government wear white carnations in honor of America’s mothers. Today, we continue to mark Mother’s Day by paying tribute to the women who shape our characters and set our families up for success. Through their example, our children learn the principles of hard work, compassion, service, and personal responsibility. Through their encouragement and unconditional support, they instill the confidence and values so vital to our children’s success.

Mothers raise children under an array of circumstances, and many work long hours inside and outside the home balancing myriad demands. Mothers are leaders and trailblazers in every part of our society—from classrooms to boardrooms, at home and overseas, on the beat and on the bench. We celebrate the efforts of all our Nation’s mothers, and we recognize that when more households are relying on women as primary or co-breadwinners, the success of women in our economy is essential to the success of our families, our communities, and our country. That is why I created the White House Council on Women and Girls as one of my first acts in office—to ensure we integrate the needs of women and girls into every decision we make. I was proud to sign the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, which continues to help women secure equal pay for equal work, and my Administration continues to promote workplace flexibility so no mother has to choose between her job and her child. And because of the Affordable Care Act, women finally have more power to make choices about their health care, and they have expanded access to a wide variety of preventive services such as mammograms at no additional cost.

Today, let us pay respect to mothers across America by embracing the women who continue to guide and inspire us, and by holding fast to the memories of those who live on in our hearts.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Barack Obama, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 13, 2012, as Mother’s Day. I urge all Americans to express love and gratitude to mothers everywhere, and I call upon all citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand twelve, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-sixth.

BARACK OBAMA

Proclamation 8980 – Mother’s Day, 2013
May 10, 2013
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Today, sons and daughters all across America come together to honor the women who raised them. Whether single or in partnership, foster or adoptive, mothers hold a special place in our hearts. For many of us, they are our first caretakers and our first teachers, imparting the early lessons that guide us growing up. And no matter the challenges we face or the paths we choose, moms are there for their children with hope and love—scraping and sacrificing and doing whatever it takes to give them a bright future.

That work has often stretched outside the home. In the century since Americans first came together to mark Mother’s Day, generations of women have empowered their children with the courage and grit to fight for change. But they have also fought to secure it themselves. Mothers pioneered a path to the vote, from Seneca Falls to the 19th Amendment. They helped write foundational protections into our laws, like freedom from workplace discrimination and access to affordable health care. They shattered ceilings in business and government, on the battlefield and on the court. With every step, they led the way to a more perfect Union, widening the circle of opportunity for our daughters and sons alike.

That history of striving and success affirms America’s promise as a place where all things can be possible for all people. But even now, we have more work to do before that promise is made real for each of us. Workplace inflexibility puts a strain on too many mothers juggling their jobs’ needs with those of their kids. Wage inequality still leaves too many families struggling to make ends meet. These problems affect all of us—and just as mothers pour themselves into giving their children the best chance in life, we need to make sure they get the fairness and opportunities they deserve.

On Mother’s Day, we give thanks to proud, caring women from every walk of life. Whether balancing the responsibilities of career and family or taking up the work of sustaining a home, a mother’s bond with her child is unwavering; her love, unconditional. Today, we celebrate those blessings, and we renew them for the year to come.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Barack Obama, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 12, 2013, as Mother’s Day. I urge all Americans to express love and gratitude to mothers everywhere, and I call upon all citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand thirteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-seventh.

BARACK OBAMA

Proclamation 9124 – Mother’s Day, 2014
May 9, 2014
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

For over a century, Americans have come together to celebrate our first friends and mentors, our inspirations and constant sources of strength. Our mothers are breadwinners, community leaders, and pillars of family. They pioneer scientific discoveries, serve with valor in our Armed Forces, and represent our Nation in the loftiest halls of Government. Whether biological, adoptive, or foster, they play a singular role in our lives. Because they so often put everything above themselves, on Mother’s Day, we put our moms first.

Through centuries of organizing, marching, and making their voices heard, mothers have won greater opportunities than ever before for themselves and their children. Their victories brought our Nation closer to realizing a sacred founding principle—that we are all created equal and each of us deserves the chance to pursue our own version of happiness.

Today, there are more battles to win. Working mothers increasingly provide the majority of their family’s income, yet even now, discrimination prevents women from earning a living equal to their efforts. My Administration is proud to fight alongside women as they push to close the gender pay gap, shatter glass ceilings, and implement workplace policies that do not force any parent to choose between their jobs and their kids. Because when women succeed, America succeeds.

By words and example, mothers teach us how to grow and who to become. They shape lasting habits that can lead to healthy living and lifelong learning. They demonstrate what is possible when we work hard and apply our talents. Without complaint, they give their best every day so they and their children might achieve the scope of their dreams. Today, let us once again extend our gratitude for our mothers’ unconditional love and support—during years past and in the years to come.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

Now, Therefore, I, Barack Obama, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 11, 2014, as Mother’s Day. I urge all Americans to express love and gratitude to mothers everywhere, and I call upon all citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand fourteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-eighth.

BARACK OBAMA

 

Presidential Proclamation — Mother’s Day, 2015
 May 08, 2015
MOTHER’S DAY, 2015

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

Each May, Americans dedicate a day to honor the remarkable women who strive and sacrifice all year to ensure ours is a Nation where all things are possible. Whether married or single, LGBT or straight, biological, adoptive, or foster, mothers are the bedrocks of our lives and the foundation of our society. They are our first friends and teachers, inspiring us to reach great heights and supporting us no matter the challenges we face or the paths we choose. Today, we come together to celebrate the women who raised us and who love us unconditionally — who do whatever it takes to set us on the road to success and want nothing more than for us to lead happy, healthy lives.

Our Nation’s mothers are breadwinners, community leaders, and pillars of family. For generations, they have blazed new paths — from Seneca Falls and Selma to the boardroom, the laboratory, and the forefronts of our military conflicts — opening up new possibilities and widening the circle of opportunity. Today, these pioneers show us what is possible for ourselves and our country. They are our Nation’s innovators, tireless workers, engines of economic growth, and drivers of progress. And through their example, they teach our future dreamers and doers about the value of hard work, compassion, service, and personal responsibility.

Today, women are nearly half of the American workforce, and as a Nation, we must ensure our policies reflect this reality because no woman should have to choose between being a productive employee and a responsible mother. All women deserve equal pay for equal work and a living wage, and as President, I have fought tirelessly to advance these commonsense measures. I continue to call for increased workplace flexibility and access to paid leave, including paid sick days, and I have proposed a plan that would make quality child care available to every middle-class and low-income family with young children. I remain committed to tearing down the remaining barriers to mothers’ full and equal participation in our economy and society — because when mothers succeed, America succeeds and policies that benefit women and working families benefit us all.

We owe so much to our mothers, and they deserve policies that support them, as well as our profound love and gratitude. On Mother’s Day, we give thanks to our mothers who lift us up every day. Let us pay respect to those who continue to offer us generous love and patient counsel and hold fast to the memories of all who live on in our hearts.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year as “Mother’s Day” and requested the President to call for its appropriate observance.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 10, 2015, as Mother’s Day. I urge all Americans to express love and gratitude to mothers everywhere, and I call upon all citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand fifteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-ninth.

BARACK OBAMA

 

Presidential Proclamation 2

 

 

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