National Day of Prayer – Richard Nixon

National Day of Prayer – Richard Nixon

Richard Nixon prayer

Proclamation 3912 – Prayer for Peace, Memorial Day, 1969
May 16, 1969

By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

On Memorial Day it is customary for Americans to honor the memory of their fellow countrymen who have died in the defense of freedom. Meditating on their sacrifices, we honor not only their memory but also the principles of justice and freedom for which they gave their lives.

Yet honor is not enough. Although we cannot change the pattern of the past, we must do all we can to create a pattern of justice and peace for the future.

The Congress, by a joint resolution of May 11, 1950 (64 Stat. 158), has requested the President to issue a proclamation calling upon the people of the United States to observe each Memorial Day as a day of prayer for permanent peace and designating a period during such day when the people of the United States might unite in such supplication.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Memorial Day, Friday, May 30, 1969, as a day of prayer for permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning in each locality at 11 o’clock in the morning of that day as a time to unite in such prayer.

I urge the press, radio, television, and all other information media to cooperate in this observance.

I urge also that on this consecrated day, all the people of America offer their prayers to the Almighty to make reason and good will prevail so that peace can once again bless our nation.

As a special mark of respect for those Americans who have given their lives in the tragic struggle in Vietnam, I direct that the flag of the United States be flown at half-staff all day on Memorial Day, instead of during the customary forenoon period, on all buildings, grounds, and naval vessels of the Federal Government throughout the United States and all areas under its jurisdiction and control.

I also request the Governors of the States and of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the appropriate officials of all local units of government to direct that the flag be flown at half-staff on all public buildings during that entire day, and request the people of the United States to display the flag at half-staff from their homes for the same period.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and sixty-nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninety-third.

RICHARD NIXON

Proclamation 3940 – National Day of Prayer, 1969
October 8, 1969

By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

John Adams was the first President to live in the executive residence we call the White House. His first night there, he wrote a letter to his wife, Abigail, in which he said: “Before I end my letter, I pray Heaven to bestow the best of blessings on this house and all that shall hereafter inhabit it. May none but wise and honest men ever rule under this roof.”

This is a brief, unadorned prayer. Yet its very simplicity speaks to us today, across the years that separate the time of Adams from our own. Prayer knows no boundary of time; we in America today, in the spirit of Adams, seek the blessing of God on our nation and its leaders.

At a time in our nation’s history when the power of prayer is needed more than ever, it is fitting that we publicly demonstrate our faith in the power of prayer.

Sensible of our people’s faith, the Congress, by joint resolution of April 17, 1952, provided that the President “shall set aside and proclaim a suitable day each year, other than a Sunday, as a National Day of Prayer, on which the people of the United States may turn to God in prayer and meditation at churches, in groups, and as individuals.”

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby set aside Wednesday, October 22, as National Day of Prayer, 1969. And I ask that on this day the people of the United States pray for the achievement of America’s goal of peace with justice for all people throughout the world.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred sixty-nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fourth.

RICHARD NIXON

Proclamation 3979 – Designating a National Day of Prayer and Thanksgiving
April 17, 1970
By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

The imperiled flight and safe return of the crew of Apollo 13 were events that humbled and inspired people all over the world. We were humbled by the knowledge that in this stage of man’s exploration of space, a safe splashdown of an imperiled mission is in its way as successful as a landing on and safe return from the Moon. We were inspired by the courage of the crew, the devotion and skill of the members of the NASA team on the ground and by the offers of assistance from nations around the world.

Particularly inspiring was the spontaneous outpouring of prayer, from every corner of the world, from members of every faith, calling upon God in His infinite mercy to bring home in safety to our small planet three fellow human beings.

Now James A. Lovell, Jr., Fred W. Haise, Jr., and John L. Swigert, Jr. are home again. The prayers of millions all over the world helped to bring them home safely. I urge my fellow Americans and all the peoples of the world to join with me in offering another prayer, one of deep thanks, for the safe return of the crew of Apollo 13.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Sunday, April 19, 1970, as a National Day of Prayer and Thanksgiving.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 17th day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fourth.

Proclamation 3982 – Day of Prayer
April 30, 1970
By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

One of the cruelest tactics of the war in Vietnam is the Communists’ refusal to identify all prisoners of war, to provide information about them and to permit their families to communicate with them regularly. This callous policy is in violation of the Geneva Convention Relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War, to which North Vietnam acceded in 1957. And it is in contempt of established customs among civilized nations and of ordinary human decency.

The government of the United States of America is making and will continue to make every effort to alleviate the anxiety of the families of these prisoners by working to change this situation. The Congress by a House Concurrent Resolution of April 28, 1970, has resolved that Friday, May 1, 1970, be commemorated as a day for an appeal for international justice for all the American prisoners of war and servicemen missing in action in Southeast Asia and has requested the President to designate Sunday, May 3, 1970, as a National Day of Prayer for humane treatment and the safe return of these brave Americans.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Sunday, May 3, 1970, as a National Day of Prayer for all American Prisoners of War and Servicemen Missing in Action in Southeast Asia. I call upon all of the people of the United States to offer prayers on behalf of these men, to instill courage and perseverance in their hearts and the hearts of their loved ones and compassion in the hearts of their captors.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fourth.

Proclamation 3985 – Prayer for Peace, Memorial Day, 1970
May 20, 1970

By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

On Memorial Day we honor our war dead—not only for the sacrifices they made, but for the nation they helped to build and preserve by that sacrifice. We honor them most by remembering what it was they died for—not for glory, not for conquest, but for those concepts that bind a people together in nationhood—and brotherhood.

It is not enough to express our gratitude to the heroic dead by thought and prayer and with special reverence on Memorial Day. A more fitting memorial would be the creation of a peaceful world, free of the destructive conflicts that have plagued man’s history.

We must, therefore, as individuals and as a nation, continue the difficult quest for tranquility among all peoples and the reasoned solution of our differences. Mindful of this, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 11, 1950, has requested the President to issue a proclamation calling upon the people of the United States to observe each May 30, Memorial Day, as a day of prayer for permanent peace and designating a period during such day when the people of the United States might unite in such supplication.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Memorial Day, Saturday, May 30, 1970, as a day of prayer for permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning in each locality at 11 o’clock in the morning of that day as a time to unite in such prayer.

I urge the press, radio, television and all other information media to cooperate in this observance.

As a special mark of respect for those Americans who have given their lives in the tragic struggle in Vietnam, I direct that the flag of the United States be flown at half-staff all day on Memorial Day, instead of during the customary forenoon period, on all buildings, grounds, and naval vessels of the Federal government throughout the United States and all areas under its jurisdiction and control.

I also request the Governors of the States and of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the appropriate officials of all local units of government to direct that the flag be flown at half-staff on all public buildings during that entire day, and request the people of the United States to display the flag at half-staff from their homes for the same period.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twentieth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy, and of the Independence of the United States of America, the one hundred ninety-fourth.

RICHARD NIXON

Proclamation 4008 – National Day of Prayer, 1970
September 25, 1970
By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

“Lord, make me an instrument of thy peace.”

This ancient prayer has never been more timely than in our own day. It reminds us in striking fashion that the path to peace is through the hearts of men, and it seeks a particularly noble reward: the ability to examine one’s own role in bringing harmony and tranquility to others.

Faith in God and reliance upon his help are among our most important traditions. In recognition of the place of prayer in our national life, the Congress in 1952 provided that the President proclaim a suitable day other than a Sunday each year as a National Day of Prayer.

In complying with the directive of the Congress, I invite all Americans to pray that the scourge of war be lifted from the earth, and that the anguish of those who have felt the horrors of war be eased. It is especially fitting this year that our people ask God’s blessings for each other and for all men.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Wednesday, October 21, as National Day of Prayer, 1970. I call upon all Americans to join hearts and minds on this day in prayers for reconciliation and brotherhood among our people and for lasting peace with justice.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 25th day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

 

Proclamation 4056 – Prayer for Peace, Memorial Day, 1971
May 27, 1971

By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

It is a tradition of our Nation, as it is a tradition of most nations, to pay homage to those who have fallen in defense of our land, our people, and our principles. These men and women honor America by their sacrifice. It is for America to honor them by its devotion to those purposes for which they perished.

We cannot dismiss with easy platitudes the debt which the deaths of our countrymen lays upon us. And while the declaration of noble sentiments, the placing of flowers and the shedding of tears of remembrance can pay deserved tribute to their sacrifices, these by themselves cannot redeem those sacrifices. So let us bear witness to the plain truth that we can only insure that our soldiers and sailors and marines and airmen have not died in vain by resolving, as citizens of the land for which they died, that we shall not ourselves live in vain.

It is a simple matter to make war, and a difficult matter to make a peace. The history of man confirms this, for it records few periods when men have not somewhere in the world waged war on their fellow men. Confirmed in this truth, we know that our concern in America must be to move hand in hand with men of all nations to make the world safe for humanity. In this manner we can insure that those who died for us did not die in vain, that out of war has come redemption, and out of the search for redemption has come a true and just and lasting peace.

To manifest the concern of the American people for the purposes of peace, Congress by a joint resolution approved May 11, 1950, has requested the President to issue a proclamation calling upon the people of the United States to observe each Memorial Day as a day of prayer for permanent peace and designating a period during such day when the people of the United States might unite in such supplication.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Memorial Day, Monday, May 31, 1971, as a day of prayer for permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning in each locality at 11 o’clock in the morning of that day as a time to unite in such prayer.

I urge the press, radio, television, and all other information media to cooperate in this observance.

As a special mark of respect for those Americans who have given their lives in the tragic struggle in Vietnam, I direct that the flag of the United States be flown at half-staff all day on Memorial Day, instead of during the customary forenoon period, on all buildings, grounds, and naval vessels of the Federal government throughout the United States and all areas under its jurisdiction and control.

I also request the Governors of the United States and of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the appropriate officials of all local units of government to direct that the flag be flown at half-staff on all public buildings during that entire day, and request the people of the United States to display the flag at half-staff from their homes for the same period.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 27th day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-fifth.

RICHARD NIXON

Proclamation 4087 – National Day of Prayer, 1971
October 12, 1971
By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

The great need of our time is that of reconciliation. Nations should be reconciled to nations, races to races, families to families, individuals to individuals. Reconciliation is needed among communities, among ethnic groups, among religious denominations, among social and economic classes, among family members.

The work of reconciliation is too great to be left to man alone. In this work, man needs God, the Supreme Reconciler. The Bible tells us God is the source of reconciliation, in Whom all things are one. Under the fatherhood of God, there flourishes the brotherhood of man.

The world yearns for reconciliation, and for the renewal and the solidarity and the healing that reconciliation brings. This hunger can only be met in its fullness through prayer.

In 1952 the Congress directed the President to set aside a suitable day other than a Sunday each year as a National Day of Prayer. On this day we give special recognition to the Nation’s deep religious heritage, and we ask God’s help and His blessing.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Wednesday, October 20, as National Day of Prayer, 1971. On this day I urge that Americans pray for the fullness of reconciliation among all peoples, and for progress toward ending divisiveness in our own land and in the international community. Let us especially pray for reconciliation in Southeast Asia, and for a speedy return to their loved ones of our long-suffering prisoners of war.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

Proclamation 4112 – National Day of Prayer
February 17, 1972
By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

In times of national need, this Nation has turned always to God. The earliest memories of our national experience include a vision of George Washington kneeling on a frozen hill at Valley Forge; they include the stirring words of Benjamin Franklin as he asked the Continental Congress to begin its daily work with a prayer for, as Franklin asked “if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without His aid?”

From those beginnings, throughout our history, we have turned to God in need, in challenge, and in gratitude. We remember at the most recent days of our history when this Nation and the world listened in a moment of human triumph as a small space vehicle circled the moon and Frank Borman read from Genesis: “In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth . . . .”

Today America is moving toward the objective we have pursued throughout our history, toward a dream as old as man, toward a world at peace with itself. We have no false illusions about the possibilities of achieving such a world. But history will not forgive us if we fail to try, nor will posterity.

All nations must share in the creation of such a peace. Each nation must seek the source of strength upon which its faith in the future is founded, and upon which its hope for peace is anchored. Let this Nation turn again to God. Let this Nation turn again to prayer as the world strives to move from a time of war to a time of peace forever.

As America stretches forth the hand that holds the olive branch, we know that other hands must reach out to take it. But until the deed is done and the peace is won, we must be patient and strong. Therefore, let each man, woman and child in this land recall the ancient wisdom of the scriptures: “Our help is in the name of the Lord, Who made heaven and earth.” Let us seek that help in prayer.

We remember that our enterprise must find favor in the eyes of God, for the scriptures tell us that “Except the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it . . . .” As we pursue peace, let this people pray our search will find favor in the eyes of God and that we labor not in vain.

In recognition of the desire for peace among nations that the American people share with all the peoples of the world, the Congress by a concurrent resolution approved February 16, 1972, has requested that the President designate Sunday, February 20, 1972 as a National Day of Prayer for the cause of world peace.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Sunday, February 20, 1972, as a National Day of Prayer.

I invite all Americans to join in the quest for peace, both by uniting in their places of worship, and by pursuing privately the purposes of peace through prayer.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this seventeenth day of February, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

Proclamation 4136 – Prayer for Peace, Memorial Day, 1972
May 19, 1972

By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

At the height of the Civil War, the terrible conflict which ultimately claimed more than 200,000 American lives, Abraham Lincoln stood in a battlefield cemetery and asked a high resolve from “us, the living, . . . that these dead shall not have died in vain.” They did not die in vain, for their heroism saved the Union; and after the guns fell silent at last, a grateful Nation set aside a Memorial Day in their memory each May.

Yet the price of liberty was still not paid in full. Today, more than a hundred Memorial Days later, America looks on five more wars and over 400,000 more dead in those wars. Thus, today more than ever, we the living bear the solemn duty of redeeming the sacrifices these brave men made, and of upholding steadfastly in life the cause they served so nobly in death.

We can meet that duty best by raising to the honored legions of the fallen the most fitting memorial of all: a peace so just and secure that American sons need not give their lives again for their country.

Such a peace has been the highest goal of the United States policy for many years. We have pursued peace unremittingly—through conciliation where we could, through strength where we had to, through battle where aggression left us no choice. We shall press on in that pursuit, relying not alone on human ways and means, but also on Him who “maketh wars to cease unto the end of the earth,” who in Scripture has commanded us: “Be still, and know that I am God.”

In recognition of this deep national reliance upon divine guidance and care, the Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 11, 1950, has requested the President to issue a proclamation calling upon the people of the United States to observe each Memorial Day as a day of prayer for permanent peace.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Memorial Day, Monday, May 29, 1972, as a day of prayer for permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning in each locality at 11 o’clock in the morning of that day as a time to unite in prayer.

I urge the press, radio, television, and all other information media to cooperate in this observance.

As a special mark of respect for those Americans who have given their lives in the war in Vietnam, I direct that the flag of the united States be flown at half-staff all day on Memorial Day, instead of during the customary forenoon period, on all buildings, grounds, and naval vessels of the Federal Government throughout the United States and all areas under its jurisdiction and control.

I also request the Governors of the United States and of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the appropriate officials of all local units of government to direct that the flag be flown at half-staff on all public buildings during that entire day, and request the people of the United States to display the flag at half-staff from their homes for the same period.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this nineteenth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-sixth.

RICHARD NIXON

Proclamation 4165 – National Day of Prayer
October 9, 1972
By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

The great king Solomon, told in a night vision to ask what he wished of God, was reverent and humble enough to pray, “I am but a little child . . . Give therefore Thy servant an understanding heart . . . for who is able to judge this Thy so great a people?”

In our time as in Solomon’s, no nation can expect to prosper and live in peace—no people can govern themselves wisely—except they invoke and rely on the divine wisdom.

In all our concerns and all our affairs as a nation, both at home and abroad, prayer should be not merely an embellishment, but an essential: both the prayer of affirmation that our God is great and good, that He made us and not we ourselves, and the prayer of petition that He may guide and protect us every one.

In 1952 the Congress directed the President to set aside a suitable day other than a Sunday each year as a National Day of Prayer, in recognition of the profound religious faith on which America is built.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Wednesday, October 18, as National Day of Prayer, 1972.

I call upon all Americans to pray that day, each after his or her own manner and convictions, for Deity’s blessing on our land and for peace on earth, goodwill among all men.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-seventh.

Proclamation 4181 – National Moment of Prayer and Thanksgiving
January 26, 1973
By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

A long and trying ordeal for America has ended. Our Nation has achieved its goal of peace with honor in Vietnam.

As a people with a deep and abiding faith, we know that no great work can be accomplished without the aid and inspiration of Almighty God. No time could be more fitting for grateful prayer and meditation than the opening moment of the peace we have achieved with His help.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard M. Nixon, President of the United States of America, as requested by the Congress, do hereby designate 7:00 p.m., e.s.t., January 27, 1973 as a National Moment of Prayer and Thanksgiving, and the 24-hour period beginning then as a National Day of Prayer and Thanksgiving.

I urge all men and women of goodwill to join the prayerful hope that this moment marks not only the end of the war in Vietnam, but the beginning of a new era of world peace and understanding for all mankind. I authorize the flying of the American flag at the appointed hour, and I call on all the people of the United States to observe this moment with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-sixth day of January, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-seventh.

 

Proclamation 4218 – Prayer For Peace, Memorial Day, May 28, 1973
May 25, 1973

By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

This day of memorial to those who have given their lives to preserve America’s freedom over the centuries has special meaning for us in 1973. The longest and most difficult war in our history is over. The brave men who served so well in that conflict are home again; our valiant prisoners are free at last and reunited with their loved ones—all made possible by the firm resolve of the American people. Thus our prayers for peace this day are also prayers of thanksgiving.

Through our history we have seen despotisms and ideologies come and declare themselves the wave of the future, crushing freedom under foot—but each has passed, and freedom, sure as spring, has pushed up through the ruins again to reaffirm the essential dignity of man.

Americans have been on the side of that dignity in every war we have fought. Today, freedom survives in South Vietnam, and generations hence, the literature of liberty will tell that America demonstrated fully and finally its great commitment to its founding principles by fighting on behalf of just eighteen million people half a world away—and by achieving at last what we fought for.

Those who stood at Hue and Khe Sanh were the spiritual descendants of the heroes of Chosin, Bastogne, Gettysburg and Lexington. The patriotic line continues unbroken. America called, and the answer came back yes.

Now those soldiers and sailors and airmen who have kept freedom’s faith look to America—not for thanks, but to know if we have marked their deeds and if, in the way we live our freedom, we are determined to be worthy of those deeds.

Only by working to make war obsolete in the future can we truly redeem the sacrifices of patriots who fell in the wars of the past. The tensions which still exist among nations will yield to negotiation if we are steadfast in our purpose and patient in our endeavor. New relationships are already taking shape, pointing to the creation of a more stable and open world, a world in which hatred and discrimination are replaced by brotherhood and understanding—above all, a world free forever of fear and want and war.

This is the dream for which generations of American fighting men have made the ultimate sacrifice, from the bridge at Concord to the jungles of Vietnam. It can be achieved. Their sacrifices have moved us ever closer to it.

The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 11, 1950, has requested the President to issue a proclamation calling upon the people of the United States to observe each Memorial Day as a day of prayer for permanent peace.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Memorial Day, Monday, May 28, 1973, as a day of prayer for permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning in each locality at 11 o’clock in the morning of that day as a time to unite in prayer.

I urge the press, radio, television, and all other information media to cooperate in this observance.

As a special mark of respect for those Americans who have given their lives in the war in Vietnam, I direct that the flag of the United States be flown at half-staff all day on Memorial Day on all buildings, grounds, and naval vessels of the Federal Government throughout the United States and all areas under its jurisdiction and control.

I also request the Governors of the United States and of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the appropriate officials of all local units of government to direct that the flag be flown at half-staff on all public buildings during that entire day, and request the people of the United States to display the flag at half-staff from their homes for the same period.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-fifth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-seventh.

RICHARD NIXON

Proclamation 4248 – National Day of Prayer
October 5, 1973
By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

America is a nation under God. This is not a consequence of legislative mandate, but of the spiritual commitment of a people. Throughout our history, we have turned to God for guidance, for sustenance, and in gratitude for the blessings of freedom.

When our forbears stood on the rocks at Plymouth, they turned to God in prayer.

When our Founding Fathers created a nation nearly two hundred years ago, they asked God’s blessing upon their endeavor.

When those who shaped our form of government met in 1787, they sought God’s assistance.

When our Nation threatened to tear itself apart a little over a hundred years ago, Abraham Lincoln turned to God for the understanding to keep us together.

We do not assume God’s favor, but we seek it. We do not suppose that our way is God’s way, but we pray for the wisdom to understand God’s way, and the grace to let it be our own. For we know that neither wealth, nor wisdom, nor strength of arms can sustain a nation’s greatness, except that God look with favor on the purposes of that nation and its people.

The challenges of our future are no less grave than those faced and met by the men and women to whose faith we are indebted for the constantly recurring miracle of America. As we act to meet the challenges of the American future, let us do so with the same profound faith in the God of our fathers, mindful of the words of the Psalms: “Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord; and the people whom He bath chosen for His own inheritance.”

Now, Therefore, I, Richard Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Wednesday, October 17, as National Day of Prayer, 1973. I ask that on this day the people of the United States join in reaffirming our dependence on God’s grace, beseeching His blessings on our endeavors and His guidance in the search for peace, reconciliation, and goodwill among all people.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day of October, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America, the one hundred and ninety-eighth.

Proclamation 4294 – Prayer for Peace, Memorial Day, May 27, 1974
May 25, 1974

By the President of the United States Of America
A Proclamation

The defense of freedom and the search for peace cannot be separated. Together, they are an essential part of the American ideal. During the past two hundred years, our Nation has endured sacrifice in battle for the sake of this ideal. Americans died valiantly at Saratoga, King’s Mountain, and Yorktown because they would not buy peace at the price of liberty. Americans died at Shiloh, Antietam, Gettysburg, and Vicksburg because a peace that cost the division of the Nation and the enslavement of a people could not be accepted.

We have occasion to show special gratitude this Memorial Day to those who fell in the cause of freedom in the longest and perhaps the most difficult war in our history. Because of their efforts, and the efforts of all our fighting forces, we can celebrate a year in which no American serviceman has fallen in the defense of his country.

During the past year, we have made progress toward the creation of a stable world order based on respect for the dignity and the larger interests of all nations. We have made this progress in part because America has pursued its tasks from a base of strength—not only military and economic strength, but strength of conviction and strength of purpose. We have been steadied in our resolve by the example of patience, self-sacrifice, and courage of our servicemen and women during the difficult years now past.

To our valiant dead we can pay no greater tribute than to emulate their dedication to a world free from the threat of force and the rule of fear. To them we dedicate our prayers for a new generation of peace and a new spirit of community among all the peoples of the world.

Now, Therefore, I, Richard M. Nixon, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Memorial Day, Monday, May 27, 1974, as a day of prayer for permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning in each locality at eleven o’clock in the morning of that day as a time to unite in prayer.

I urge the press, radio, television, and all other information media to cooperate in this observance.

I direct that the flag of the United States be flown at half-staff all day on Memorial Day on all buildings, grounds, and naval vessels of the Federal Government throughout the United States and all areas under its jurisdiction and control.

I also call upon the Governors of the fifty States, the Governor of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and appropriate officials of all local units of government to direct that the flag be flown at half-staff on all public buildings during that entire day, and I request the people of the United States to display the flag at half-staff from their homes for the same period.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-fifth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-four, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred ninety-eighth.

RICHARD NIXON

 

 

National Day of Prayer

 

 

Prayer Breakfasts – Richard Nixon

blessing 4

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