National Day of Prayer – Jimmy Carter

National Day of Prayer – Jimmy Carter

Jimmy Carter prayer 2

Proclamation 4504 – Prayer for Peace, Memorial Day, May 30, 1977
April 25, 1977

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The greatest honor we can pay those who have given their lives in our Nation’s defense is to serve the ideals for which they died.

We properly honor these men and women on Memorial Day–as we honor those who fought and lived, to continue the struggle for peace, freedom, justice, and human rights.

Those of us who survived the battle, or who never had to bear it, must work to assure that no American will ever be asked to offer up his or her life in war unless the survival of our Nation or of democracy itself is at stake.

Let us remember on Memorial Day those who have lived and died in pursuit of a just peace. Let us pray that, like them, we will leave behind us a stronger Nation and a better world.

In tribute to those Americans who have died for their country, and to those who survived to carry on their unfinished work, the Congress, by joint resolution of May 11, 1950 (64 Slat. 158), has requested the President to issue a proclamation calling upon the American people to observe each Memorial Day as a day of prayer for permanent. peace.

Now, Therefore, I, Jimmy Carter, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Memorial Day, Monday, May 30, 1977, as a day of prayer for permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning in each locality at 11 o’clock in the morning of that day as a time to unite in prayer.

I urge the press, radio, television, and all other information media to join in this observance.

I call upon the appropriate officials of all levels of government to fly the flag at half-staff until noon during Memorial Day on all buildings, grounds, and naval vessels throughout the United States and in all areas under its jurisdiction and control. I request the people of the United States to display the flag at half-staff from their homes for the same customary forenoon period.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-fifth day of April, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-seven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and first.

JIMMY CARTER

Proclamation 4532 – National Day of Prayer, 1977
October 13, 1977
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Throughout our Nation’s history Americans of all faiths have turned to Divine Providence for the strength and wisdom to meet whatever challenges were put fore them with honor and dignity.

The tasks we face today are as great as those faced by any generation of Americans. Our actions and choices will, for many years to come, affect not only ourselves but all the peoples with whom we share this tiny planet.

It is therefore fitting that we set aside a day of prayer and meditation to ask the Almighty for the vision to see our duty as individuals and as a Nation and for the courage to pursue it, even at the cost of personal or collective sacrifice.

Recognizing this, the Congress by joint resolution approved April 17, 1952 (36 U.S.C. 185; 66 Stat. 64) has called upon the President to set aside a suitable day each year as a National Day of Prayer.

Now, Therefore, I, Jimmy Carter, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Thursday, December 15, 1977, as National Day of Prayer. I ask all Americans to join with me on that day in asking God’s help that we may see and understand our responsibilities and discharge them in a manner that befits a just and good people.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this thirteenth day October, in the year of our Lord hundred seventy-seven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and second.

Proclamation 4572 – Prayer for Peace, Memorial Day, May 29, 1978
May 19, 1978

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

We pause at this time of year to remember those who sacrificed their lives over the last two centuries to preserve America’s freedoms.

We honor them today for their faith in the principles of liberty and justice which motivated our founding fathers, and must motivate us today.

The highest tribute we can pay those who fought and sometimes died for our country is to strengthen in time of peace those values for which they struggled in time of war.

Let us pray for peace, but let us also vow that, if the test of unavoidable combat should ever come again, we will meet it with courage, and devotion to our country.

Now, Therefore, I, Jimmy Carter, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Memorial Day, May 29, 1978, as a day for all Americans to join together in prayer for lasting peace. To that end, I designate the hour beginning in each locality at 11 o’clock on the morning of that day as the appropriate time for the American people to unite in prayer.

I call upon the appropriate officials of all levels of government to fly the flag at half-staff until noon during Memorial Day on all buildings, grounds, and naval vessels throughout the United States and in all areas under its jurisdiction and control. I request the people of the United States to display the flag at half-staff from their homes and other suitable places for the same customary forenoon period.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this nineteenth day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-eight, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and second.

JIMMY CARTER

Proclamation 4591 – National Day of Prayer, 1978
September 1, 1978
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Our Nation, perhaps more than any other, has always held a special cognizance of the gifts of the Creator. We were founded upon a belief in, and reverence for, the liberty of the human spirit under God and the equality of all people before the Almighty. Regardless of our individual conceptions of the Divine, Americans have always sought from Providence the help and guidance necessary to live justly and to build a better world for all who share this planet.

Today we face challenges equal to any in our history. Few generations have been given such opportunities for good or ill on Earth. We approach our responsibility confidently, but with sobering awareness that God’s sea is very great, and our ship, infinitely small.

From time to time we should turn to the Almighty for help and guidance, as we have done throughout our Nation’s two hundred and three years. In humility and reverence, we should pause from our daily activities to thank our Creator for the bountiful goodness that imbues our lives, and to ask for His blessing in the days ahead.

Recognizing this, the Congress by joint resolution approved April 17, 1952 (36 U.S.C. 185; 66 Stat. 64) has called upon the President to set aside a suitable day each year as a National Day of Prayer.

Now, Therefore, I, Jimmy Carter, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Saturday, October 7, 1978, as National Day of Prayer. I ask all Americans to join with me on that day in asking God’s help that we may see and understand our responsibilities and discharge them with wisdom, strength, and patience.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-eight, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and third.

 

Proclamation 4651 – Prayer for Peace, Memorial Day, May 28, 1979
March 29, 1979

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

This day was originally set aside to honor the dead in a conflict that divided our Nation more than a century ago. That wound has healed.

We come now also to honor the dead of many other wars. That we must do so is a tragic reminder that the freedoms we cherish are constantly under siege. Each generation is called upon to preserve and defend our liberties anew, often with their lives. The fact that their suffering has not yet bought a permanent peace does not make their sacrifice in vain. They preserved that which we hold most dear so that we might strive again for what they sought?a just and honorable peace in which all people settle their differences without bloodshed or oppression.

Today America celebrates peace. We gratefully remember those who gave up their hopes and lives that we might enjoy the liberties they loved?on this day and through all our tomorrows?in peace. We cannot call them back to give them our thanks, nor can we raise a monument to them any more meaningful than the one they have already left us, a free and peaceful America. They have given us a gift too valuable ever to repay, save by preserving that peace, that liberty, that America.

We have seen how easily the hopes of peace are dashed. Yet we must keep faith with those who have gone before, with those throughout the world who share our dream, and with the generations yet unborn whose very existence may depend upon the success of our efforts.

We earnestly pray that all the people of the world will join us in our struggle, so that one day all the earth may share the blessings of liberty, justice and peace.

Now, Therefore, I, Jimmy Carter, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Memorial Day, Monday, May 28, 1979, as a day of prayer for permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning in each locality at 11 o’clock in the morning of that day as a time to unite in prayer.

I urge the press, radio, television, and all other information media to join in suitable observances of this day.

I also call upon the appropriate officials of all levels of government to fly the flag at half-staff until noon during Memorial Day on all buildings, grounds, and naval vessels throughout the United States and in all areas under its jurisdiction and control, and I request the people of the United States to display the flag at halfstaff from their homes for the same customary forenoon period.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-ninth day of March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and third.

JIMMY CARTER

Proclamation 4690 – National Day of Prayer, 1979
September 19, 1979
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

The history of our country is a history of triumph over adversity. Time after time, we have overcome threats from within and without. Over the generations, wars, depressions, and internal differences and bigotry in various forms have struck at the foundations of our society. As we have met these challenges together, the bonds between us as Americans have grown stronger.

We endure and remain a land of hope because of the basic goodness and strength of our people and because the God of us all has shown us His favor.

The decisions we make today on arms, economics, social justice and global responsibilities echo into the future of the world. We accept our responsibilities and make our choices with all the will and determination at our command, but always in the full knowledge that we are finally in the hands of God. In the words of the prophet Zechariah, “Not by might, not by power but by my spirit saith the Lord of Hosts.” (4:6)

Recognizing this, the Congress by joint resolution approved April 17, 1952 (36 U.S.C. 185; 66 Stat. 64) has called upon the President to set aside a suitable day each year as a National Day of Prayer.

Now, Therefore, I, Jimmy Carter, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Wednesday, October 3, 1979, as a National Day of Prayer. I ask all Americans to join with me on that day to recommit ourselves to God, to each other and to the towering ideals of truth, justice, fairness, brotherhood, and love which our Nation has cherished and protected. Let us pray for the will and wisdom to create a world in which all people can live with each other in peace. Let us pray that careful stewardship of today’s opportunities will protect and enlarge the inheritance of liberty and security we give our children.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this nineteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred seventy-nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fourth.

American Hostages in Iran Statement Requesting Special Prayers for the Hostages During the Thanksgiving Holiday Weekend.
November 17, 1979

 

As we approach our traditional day of national thanksgiving, the hearts of all Americans are heavy with concern for the safety of those held hostage in Iran.

We join with people of all faiths throughout the world who adhere to fundamental principles of human rights and international law. We are united with them in seeking an end to acts of terrorism against innocent people.

On Thanksgiving Day and during the holiday weekend, I ask all Americans to make a special prayer at churches and synagogues and places of public meeting.

Let us seek God’s guidance in our search for peace and human brotherhood and pray for the safe return of those whose lives are threatened. May we come with gratitude for our abundant blessings and humility before the heavy burden of world responsibility that our blessings and power have brought.

Proclamation 4754 – Prayer for Peace, Memorial Day, May 26, 1980
May 1, 1980

 

By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

It has been a national tradition since the end of the Civil War to remember on Memorial Day the men and women of America who fought and died on the battlefield. We owe them a debt that can never be annulled. Their sacrifice endowed us with liberty and made our country a leader among nations.

But on this day of mourning and of homage to the heroes of the past, let us also remember the duty we owe to coming generations to be firm in the cause of liberty.

This past year we have had abundant proof that American courage still lives-eight Americans gave up their lives and others were seriously injured in the attempt to free their fellow Americans held hostage in Iran. We can take pride in our concern for national honor and in the firmness and restraint with which Americans face crises. Mindful of our historic duty, we have become even more determined to defend our interests, protect our liberties, and promote our ideals. At the same time, we remain firmly committed to working with other nations to solve world problems together and to strengthen the foundations of world peace.

In recognition of those Americans to whom we pay tribute today, the Congress, by joint resolution of May 11, 1950 (64 Stat. 158), has requested the President to issue a proclamation calling upon the people of the United States to observe each Memorial Day as a day of prayer for permanent peace and designating a period on that day when the people of the United States might unite in prayer.

Now, Therefore, I, Jimmy Carter, President of the United States of America, do hereby designate Memorial Day, Monday, May 26, 1980, as a day of prayer for permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning in each locality at 11 o’clock in the morning of that day as a time to unite in prayer.

I urge the press, radio, television, and all other information media to cooperate in this observance.

I also request the Governors of the United States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the appropriate officials of all local units of government to direct that the flag be flown at half-staff during this Memorial Day on all buildings, grounds, and naval vessels throughout the United States and in all areas under its jurisdiction and control, and I request the people of the United States to display the flag at half-staff from their homes for the customary forenoon period.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of May, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty, and of the Independence of the United-States of America the two hundred and fourth.

JIMMY CARTER

 

Proclamation 4795 – National Day of Prayer, 1980
September 22, 1980
By the President of the United States of America
A Proclamation

Our Nation’s current electoral process is both testimony and example of the power of free men and women to govern themselves. Our forebears, drawing from a faith in the people rooted in a firm faith in God, launched this grand experiment in responsible self-government. In the days ahead, no matter what our individual political convictions, we can all be grateful for the honor and integrity of this noble process.

Without trying to impose our will on other nations, let us continue to hold high the torch of liberty and democracy that has illumined our land. Laying aside arrogance and false pride, let us continue to urge self-determination and human rights as the best way for peoples everywhere to realize their own full destiny.

Let us pray that freedom, in all its manifestations, may be the reality of the present and the wave of the future. Let us pray that people everywhere will be free-free even to make their own mistakes as they struggle to build a life of material security and spiritual satisfaction.

As we pray, let us never forget the American citizens in Iran who remain hostages in fundamental violation of the teachings of the world’s religions. Let us also pray that harmony and stability will come to the people of Iran, leading both to the safe return of our brothers and sisters and to a better life for all in that troubled land.

Recognizing our need for prayer, the Congress, by Joint Resolution, approved April 17, 1952 (36 U.S.C. 169h; 66 Stat. 64), has called upon the President to set aside a suitable day each year as a National Day of Prayer.

Now, Therefore, I, Jimmy Carter, President of the United States of America do hereby proclaim Monday, October 6, 1980, as a National Day of Prayer. I further ask that all who so desire make this a Day of Fast as well. On that day, I ask Americans to join me in thanksgiving to God for His blessings and in earnest prayer to Him for His protection in the year ahead. Finally, may He grant freedom to all unjustly held captive, and may He grant us His vision of a world at peace.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and eighty, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fifth.

 

 

National Day of Prayer

 

Prayer Breakfasts – Jimmy Carter

blessing 4

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