Hebrew Roots of Christian Holidays – Easter Eggs

Hebrew Roots of Christian Holidays

 

The origins of Christianity and the original customs thereof come not from pagans. They come from the Holy Bible and ancient Hebrew thought.

Easter comes not from pagan worship but from ancient Jewish thought and interpretation of the Holy Scriptures by the early Church.  The claims that Easter is founded in paganism are based upon either outright lies or applying pagan parallels which can be done to virtually everything in the Scriptures, including the Old Testament.  Many are well-meaning in their desire to discard “pagan” elements of Christianity but in so doing are inadvertently attacking the entire Christian faith and the Holy Bible at the same time.

On one side, Easter eggs and bunnies can be linked to pagans as these things (rabbits & eggs) were symbolically used in various ways by various cultures but on the other side they can be traced back to the Bible and shadows of Messiah embedded in nature.  In order to see how these things became incorporated into the ancient celebration of Easter one must look at the writings (source documents) of the Church.  We cannot assume that these customs were adopted by Christians from their pagan neighbors if there is not legitimate evidence (multiple witnesses – Deuteronomy 17:6; 19:15; Matthew 18:16; 2 Corinthians 13:1; 1 Timothy 5:19) of this.

If we are convicted not to celebrate Christian holidays or participate in customs such as Easter eggs we shouldn’t condemn our brothers in Messiah who do so as “pagans” when there isn’t good evidence that the origin of these customs come from paganism. We should receive them as brothers as God does as Romans 14 talks about. If they are doing it unto the Lord then they are glorifying Him and we shouldn’t speak against them and slander them (Psalm 59:19-23).

It’s up to each one of us to work out our own salvation with fear and trembling (Philippians 2:12), being fully persuaded in our own minds (Romans 14:5-6), seeking to not put a stumbling block before our brothers (Romans 14:13-14). We are all going to stand before the judgment seat of Christ and He will judge whether or not someone was doing a custom unto Him or not (Romans 14:10).
Let each person be convinced in his or her own mind and follow the Lord wholeheartedly in that conviction (Romans 14:5-6). We all have to work out our own salvation with fear and trembling so we ought not to point the finger of condemnation at others as each one of us falls or stands according to the Lord, not man (Romans 14:4).  Regardless of what ‘side’ one chooses, we are to receive each other as the Lord has received us (Romans 14:1-4), bearing one another in love (Romans 15:1-3; 1 Corinthians 13:7).

 

Pagan origin of Easter eggs?

“We have no record of any pagan worshipping “Ostara/Eostre.” We have no record of any rituals associated with her, and that includes no rituals that make use of rabbits and eggs, contrary to what some of the anti-Easter crowd say.”

“Eggs were traditions among the Orthodox since who knows when and weren’t introduced in the Latin west perhaps until after 1,000 A.D. They don’t even factor in. Even if they were pagan fertility symbols to remote cultures, we have no evidence these things came from the Germans, or that they were adopted into Christianity from pagans.”  {Easter is Pagan And Other Fables – J.P. Holding: Tekton Apologetics Ministries}

Great Lent and Holy Week

“There’s no historical evidence that coloring Easter eggs comes from the blood of sacrificed infants, that is a “myth” of Alexander Hislop. However, there is ancient tradition as to how this custom originated.”

“Many popular Easter customs originated in the Christian East.

The coloring of “Easter eggs” originated from the pious legend that Mary Magdala was bringing cooked eggs to share with the other women at the tomb of Christ – This remains the tradition among observant Jews even in our own time – When Mary Magdala saw the Lord, the eggs in her basket turned brilliant red. Thus, the true meaning of dyeing Easter eggs is to show forth the miraculous transformation and re-creation of the whole world by the victorious resurrection of Christ.

The origin of the “Easter basket” The faithful, having fasted and abstained from meats, eggs, and dairy products throughout all of Great Lent, would bring baskets of these festive foods to church on Easter Sunday. There the priests would bless the baskets after Divine liturgy and the people would share their foods with one another and the poor in a true “break-fast.”

Even Spring cleaning is found in the tradition of the Eastern Churches. During the great week before Pascha the faithful would clean their homes with special care and attention so that no imperfection however slight would mar the purity of the Resurrection. In Eastern Europe all the contents of the house would be brought outside and the building would be scrubbed from top to bottom inside and out.”

The Orthodox Christian Tradition of Exchanging Red Eggs at Pascha

“It is an ancient Orthodox Christian tradition to have red eggs at Pascha. Many people are surprised to find out that this tradition dates to the Apostolic era. The custom of presenting each other with a red egg at Pascha reflects an interchange between Mary Magdalene and Tiberius Caesar.

After the resurrection, Mary Magdalene became a strong witness and traveling preacher of the Gospel, and for this she is referred to as an “equal to the Apostles.”

Her travels eventually took Mary Magdalene to Rome, where because of her family’s standing she was able to obtain an audience with the Roman Emperor, Tiberius Caesar. Her purpose was to protest to him that his governor in Judea, Pontius Pilate, and the two high priests, Annas and Caiaphas, had conspired and executed an innocent man, namely our Lord Jesus Christ.

She presented him with a red egg (representing the stone which had been rolled away), saying: “Christ is risen!” She told Caesar of Pilate’s injustice toward Jesus. He responded by moving Pilate to Gaul, where he died under imperial displeasure after a prolonged illness. She then assisted St. John the Theologian in Ephesus. She preached boldly the gospel of the Risen Lord whom she loved.

According to the tradition, everyone visiting the Emperor was supposed to bring him a gift. Rich and influential people, of course, brought expensive gifts whereas the poor offered whatever they could afford. Mary Magdalene took an egg to the Emperor’s palace and handed it to Tiberius Caesar with the greeting: “Christ is risen!”

Tiberius Caesar, naturally, could not believe what he heard and responded to her: “How could anyone ever rise from the dead? It is as impossible as that white egg to turn red.” While Tiberius was speaking these words, the egg in the hand of Mary Magdalene began changing color until it finally became bright red.

Thus the Pascha greeting — in universal Christendom, both East and West — has ever since remained “Christ is risen!” and it became traditional for Christians throughout the world to color eggs in red.

Mary Magdalene then went on to explain to Tiberius Caesar that the now-red egg symbolized life rising from a sealed chamber, a symbol that would have been understandable to a pagan Roman.”

Eggs

The Hebrew word for egg is ביצה ‘beytsah’ which comes from the root בץ ‘bets’ meaning mud. Mud is mixture of water and earth, pointing back to Genesis 1:9-13 and the earth ‘rising’ out of the waters which is a picture of the resurrection.

The dividing of water and dirt and it’s connection to the resurrection is also seen in mud.

 

In the Scriptures, deliverance is linked to being pulled up out of the mire.

 

Psa 40:2  And He drew me up from the pit of tumult, out of the miry clay; He lifted my feet on a rock; He directed my steps.

 

Interestingly, one of the Hebrew words for fine linen {בוץ ‘buts’} (Revelation 19:8, 14) comes from this root.

 

 

White – resurrection connection

egg white

Job 6:6  Can that which is unsavoury be eaten without salt? or is there any taste in the white of an egg?

 

The word here for white is ריר ‘riyr’ which means the flowing of a liquid as in the yolk of an egg.

The word for egg  in Job 6:6 is חלמות ‘chalamut’ which comes from the root חלם ‘chalam’ which means to dream from the parent root חל ‘chal’ which means to pass through or change.  This is what the purpose of the egg is, a transitional home for the chick.

 

White is the color of resurrection

 

The garments designed for the priests were a shadow picture of the resurrected believers who are clothed in white, likened unto snow.  Being clothed with His righteousness is also linked with the earth springing forth plants during Spring.

 

Isa 61:10  Rejoicing I will rejoice in Jehovah. My soul shall be joyful in my God. For He clothed me with garments of salvation; He put on me the robe of righteousness, even as a bridegroom dons as a priest his head-dress, and as a bride wears her ornaments.

Isa 61:11  For as the earth comes out with her buds, and as a garden causes that which is sown to grow, so the Lord Jehovah will make righteousness and praise to grow before all the nations.

Psa 132:9  Let Your priests be clothed with righteousness, and let Your saints shout for joy.

Psa 132:16  And I will clothe her priests with salvation; and her saints shall surely shout.

 

The fine linen that the priests wore (Exodus 28:5, 8, 15 etc.) is from the following Hebrew word {שש ‘shesh’} which means white & the number 6:

 

The garments of the priest were worn to display that iniquity was not upon them (Exodus 28:43).  The white linen is the righteousness of the saints (Revelation 19:7-9).  What is Righteousness?  It is the Word/Messiah.

It is interesting to note that the Hebrew word for winter, חרף ‘charaph,’ comes from the same root as egg (חלמות ‘chalamut’), חל ‘chal.’   The egg is linked to Spring, which is a picture of passing from death to life.  Winter is a picture of death, Spring a picture of life & resurrection.

egg coloring

Coloring an egg is a picture of death & resurrection.   In Hebrew, the word for baptism is a picture of a woman taking linen and dipping it into a colored dye where the linen or cloth becomes that new color after being dipped into the water.  Baptism is the act of dipping something into water so that it becomes new.

 

H2881

טבל

ṭâbal

BDB Definition:

1) to dip, dip into, plunge

1a) (Qal)

1a1) to dip in or into

1a2) to dip oneself

1b) (Niphal) to be dipped

Part of Speech: verb

A Related Word by BDB/Strong’s Number: a primitive root

 

Interestingly, the word for color in Hebrew is צבע ‘tseva,’ which has a similar meaning as טבל ‘tebel.’  צבע ‘tseva’ means to dip the finger (especially in blood) to color something.

 

צבע ‘tseva’ (color) and טבל ‘tebel’ (baptism/dipping) are connected through the idea of “dyeing” something as both have this meaning.  It is interesting to note that חמץ ‘chamets’ is translated as “dye” in the Scriptures (Isaiah 63:1).  חמץ ‘chamets’ is also translated as leaven.  As mentioned before, Easter came forth from the Feast of Unleavened Bread when leaven was to be removed from our dwellings (Exodus 12:15).

The custom of hiding and retrieving Easter eggs has parallels in Judaism with the אפיקומן ‘afikoman’ tradition and dipping of the unleavened bread into the  חֲרֽוֹסֶת ‘charoset’ done during Passover seders.  Some believe that the Last Supper was a Passover Seder due to a number of parallels and is remembered by Christians on “Maundy Thursday” or “Covenant Thursday”.

easter egg matsa

חרוסת ‘charoset’ is a symbol of Israel’s slavery in Egypt, building bricks of clay/mud (חרס ‘cheres’) for Pharaoh.  As mentioned before, the Hebrew word for egg is ביצה ‘beytsah’ which comes from the root בץ ‘bets’ meaning mud.  Israel’s slavery to Pharaoh in Egypt was a picture of mankind’s slavery to sin (John 8:34).  When we are slaves to sin, we are “free from righteousness” (Romans 6:19-20).  We can only become righteous through faith in Christ where we die to ourselves that we might live unto Christ (Galatians 2:19-21).  It is only then that we can become free from sin (Romans 6:6).  It is then that we are born again from above (1 Peter 1:23; James 1:18-21) as a chick inside of a shell waiting to break forth into new life (Romans 8:21).

Coloring of the egg is linked to leaven {חמץ ‘chamets’} and the filthy righteousness we cover ourselves in which must be broken in order for true life to spring forth.  Jesus said the leaven of the Pharisees was hypocrisy (Luke 12:1).  ὑποκρισις  ‘hupokrisis’ (hypocrite) is a an actor, one who hides the their true self with a false exterior.  Jesus described this hypocrisy as ‘whitewashed tombs’ (Matthew 23:27-28).  ὑποκρισις  ‘hupokrisis’ is used in the Septuagint to translate the Hebrew word חנף ‘chaneph’ which means filthy, as in our righteousness with are filthy rags (Isaiah 64:6).
The Hebrew word for unleavened bread is מצצה ‘matsah’ which is related to the word מצא ‘matsa’ which means to find, “in the sense of squeezing out of a hidden place”.
matsa find
The chick coming forth out of an egg is a perfect depiction of “squeezing out” of a hidden place.  The root of מצצה ‘matsah’ (unleaved bread) and מצא ‘matsa’ (find) is מץ ‘mats’ which means a strong internal pressure.  Again, this points to the chick inside of the egg.  Further connecting the chick and egg to Easter is the word פרח ‘parach’ which means “spring” and the blossoming and budding of flowers and trees.  The Hebrew word for chick is אפר ‘ephroach’ which comes from this word פרח ‘parach’ as the chick bursts forth from the egg in the same way that buds and blossoms spring forth from plants during the Spring season. Passover/Easter, of course, are celebrated during the season of Spring.
passover plate
Another connection to Easter eggs and the Passover Seder are the roasted eggs which are a part of the Passover seder meal.  These eggs are said to symbolize the passover sacrifice that was offered in the Temple in Jerusalem.  In other words, after the Temple was destroyed, Jews replaced the lamb with an egg.  Jesus was THE passover lamb who took away the sins of the world on the cross (John 1:29, 36; 1 Corinthians 5:7).  This further connects the aforementioned symbolism of the Easter egg.
afikoman
The custom of hiding the אפיקומן ‘afikoman’ during the Passover seder points to the burial of Christ in the tomb and parallels the hiding of Easter eggs done by Christians today.  The retrieval of the אפיקומן ‘afikoman’ and the finding of Easter eggs pictures Christ rising from the dead, leaving an empty tomb.
One of the traditions of the Eastern Orthodox church is that of Mary Magdalene bringing cooked eggs to share with the other women who would be at the tomb of Jesus.  It is said that the eggs miraculously turned red when she saw the empty tomb.
Easter egg cros
Coloring Easter eggs pictures the sin or “leaven” which was put upon Christ on the cross resulting in His death (2 Corinthians 5:21).  In Christian tradition, Easter eggs are used to picture the death and resurrection of Jesus.  The egg symbolizes the tomb of Jesus as it looks like a “white sepulchre”.  As the bird hatches from the egg leaving an empty shell so too did Jesus resurrect from the dead and left an empty tomb.  Orthodox Christians have long dyed eggs red to represent the blood of Christ which was shed for the sins of the world.
Baptism (dipping into water) is a symbol that Christians have “died and risen” with Jesus.  This is pictured by the egg being dipped and colored.Rom 6:3  Know ye not, that so many of us as were baptized into Jesus Christ were baptized into his death?
Rom 6:4  Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life.
 
It is through baptism that we are given the garments of salvation, we put on Christ.
Gal 3:27  For as many of you as have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ.
 
Isa 61:10  I will greatly rejoice in the LORD, my soul shall be joyful in my God; for he hath clothed me with the garments of salvation {ישע ‘yesha’ – source of the name Jesus}, he hath covered me with the robe of righteousness, as a bridegroom decketh himself with ornaments, and as a bride adorneth herself with her jewels.
Isa 61:11  For as the earth bringeth forth her bud, and as the garden causeth the things that are sown in it to spring forth; so the Lord GOD will cause righteousness and praise to spring forth before all the nations.
As mentioned before, these garments are white as in the color of an egg and point to the “fine linen” of the saints.
Psa 132:9  Let Your priests be clothed with righteousness, and let Your saints shout for joy.
Psa 132:16  And I will clothe her priests with salvation; and her saints shall surely shout.
The fine linen that the priests wore (Exodus 28:5, 8, 15 etc.) is from the following Hebrew word which means white & the number 6:
shesh
Christians are His priesthood, clothed in the garments of salvation {ישועה ‘yeshuah’ – source of the name Jesus}/His righteousness (Psalm 132:16; Isaiah 61:10; Romans 13:14; Galatians 3:27))

This word שש ‘shesh’ (white, linen, six) is the root of the word שושן ‘shoshan’ which means lily, another Easter symbol.  More on the lily later.

Great Lent and Holy Week

“There’s no historical evidence that coloring Easter eggs comes from the blood of sacrificed infants, that is a “myth” of Alexander Hislop. However, there is ancient tradition as to how this custom originated.”“Many popular Easter customs originated in the Christian East.The coloring of “Easter eggs” originated from the pious legend that Mary Magdala was bringing cooked eggs to share with the other women at the tomb of Christ – This remains the tradition among observant Jews even in our own time – When Mary Magdala saw the Lord, the eggs in her basket turned brilliant red. Thus, the true meaning of dyeing Easter eggs is to show forth the miraculous transformation and re-creation of the whole world by the victorious resurrection of Christ.The origin of the “Easter basket” The faithful, having fasted and abstained from meats, eggs, and dairy products throughout all of Great Lent, would bring baskets of these festive foods to church on Easter Sunday. There the priests would bless the baskets after Divine liturgy and the people would share their foods with one another and the poor in a true “break-fast.”Even Spring cleaning is found in the tradition of the Eastern Churches. During the great week before Pascha the faithful would clean their homes with special care and attention so that no imperfection however slight would mar the purity of the Resurrection. In Eastern Europe all the contents of the house would be brought outside and the building would be scrubbed from top to bottom inside and out.”

 

Easter Basket

easter basketThe blessing upon Easter eggs brought to the priest in a basket traces back to the bringing forth of one’s firstfruits to the priest in a basket.  Easter (resurrection) comes forth from the feast of firstfruits (1 Corinthians 15:20-23; Leviticus 23:10-11).

Deu 26:2  That thou shalt take of the first of all the fruit of the earth, which thou shalt bring of thy land that the LORD thy God giveth thee, and shalt put it in a basket, and shalt go unto the place which the LORD thy God shall choose to place his name there.
Deu 26:3  And thou shalt go unto the priest that shall be in those days, and say unto him, I profess this day unto the LORD thy God, that I am come unto the country which the LORD sware unto our fathers for to give us.
Deu 26:4  And the priest shall take the basket out of thine hand, and set it down before the altar of the LORD thy God.
Deu 26:5  And thou shalt speak and say before the LORD thy God, A Syrian ready to perish was my father, and he went down into Egypt, and sojourned there with a few, and became there a nation, great, mighty, and populous:
Deu 26:6  And the Egyptians evil entreated us, and afflicted us, and laid upon us hard bondage:
Deu 26:7  And when we cried unto the LORD God of our fathers, the LORD heard our voice, and looked on our affliction, and our labour, and our oppression:
Deu 26:8  And the LORD brought us forth out of Egypt with a mighty hand, and with an outstretched arm, and with great terribleness, and with signs, and with wonders:
Deu 26:9  And he hath brought us into this place, and hath given us this land, even a land that floweth with milk and honey.
Deu 26:10  And now, behold, I have brought the firstfruits of the land, which thou, O LORD, hast given me. And thou shalt set it before the LORD thy God, and worship before the LORD thy God:

 

The Orthodox Christian Tradition of Exchanging Red Eggs at Pascha

“It is an ancient Orthodox Christian tradition to have red eggs at Pascha. Many people are surprised to find out that this tradition dates to the Apostolic era. The custom of presenting each other with a red egg at Pascha reflects an interchange between Mary Magdalene and Tiberius Caesar.After the resurrection, Mary Magdalene became a strong witness and traveling preacher of the Gospel, and for this she is referred to as an “equal to the Apostles.”

Her travels eventually took Mary Magdalene to Rome, where because of her family’s standing she was able to obtain an audience with the Roman Emperor, Tiberius Caesar. Her purpose was to protest to him that his governor in Judea, Pontius Pilate, and the two high priests, Annas and Caiaphas, had conspired and executed an innocent man, namely our Lord Jesus Christ.She presented him with a red egg (representing the stone which had been rolled away), saying: “Christ is risen!” She told Caesar of Pilate’s injustice toward Jesus. He responded by moving Pilate to Gaul, where he died under imperial displeasure after a prolonged illness. She then assisted St. John the Theologian in Ephesus. She preached boldly the gospel of the Risen Lord whom she loved.According to the tradition, everyone visiting the Emperor was supposed to bring him a gift. Rich and influential people, of course, brought expensive gifts whereas the poor offered whatever they could afford.

Mary Magdalene took an egg to the Emperor’s palace and handed it to Tiberius Caesar with the greeting: “Christ is risen!”Tiberius Caesar, naturally, could not believe what he heard and responded to her: “How could anyone ever rise from the dead? It is as impossible as that white egg to turn red.” While Tiberius was speaking these words, the egg in the hand of Mary Magdalene began changing color until it finally became bright red.Thus the Pascha greeting — in universal Christendom, both East and West — has ever since remained “Christ is risen!” and it became traditional for Christians throughout the world to color eggs in red.

Mary Magdalene then went on to explain to Tiberius Caesar that the now-red egg symbolized life rising from a sealed chamber, a symbol that would have been understandable to a pagan Roman.”

Mary Magdalene is painted in iconography holding the red egg once presented to Tiberius Caesar, which she used to explain the mystery of Christ rising from a sealed tomb.

 

Jewish Holy Days: The Making of a Baby
By J. R. Church

Jewish Holydays making a baby

“Zola Levitt discovered an amazing correlation between Jewish Holy Days and the gestation of a human baby, from conception to birth. While preparing for writing a book for new parents, Zola contacted a gynecologist for some help in understanding gestation. During that session, the gynecologist showed him a series of pictures, pointed to the first one (an egg and a sperm) and said, “On the fourteenth day of the first month, the egg appears.” The statement struck a chord in his Jewish mind because that was the date of Passover. He remembered the roasted egg on his family table every Passover. Now, for the first time, he knew what it meant! Not wanting to lead the gynecologist off from the subject at hand, he didn’t say anything, but continued to listen.

The gynecologist continued: “The egg must be fertilized within 24 hours, or it will pass on.” This reminded Zola of the Feast of Unleavened Bread and the seed or grain that “fell into the ground and died” in order to produce a harvest, the firstfruits of which was presented to God. Next, the gynecologist said, “Within two to six days, the fertilized egg attaches itself to the wall of the womb and begins to grow.” And, sure enough, the Jewish evangelist thought, “The Feast of Firstfruits is observed anywhere from two to six days after Passover!”

Next, he was shown a photo of an embryo showing arms, hands, fingers, legs, feet, toes, a head, eyes, etc. The caption said, “Fifty days.” The gynecologist continued, “Around the fiftieth day, the embryo takes on the form of a human being. Until then, we don’t know if we have a duck or a tadpole.” Zola thought, “That’s Pentecost!”

The next picture showed the embryo at seven months. The gynecologist said, “On the first day of the seventh month, the baby’s hearing is developed. For the first time, it can hear and distinguish sounds outside the womb.” Zola knew that was the date for the Jewish Festival of Trumpets.

The gynecologist continued, “On the tenth day of the seventh month, the hemoglobin of the blood changes from that of the mother, to a self-sustaining baby.” Zola thought, “That’s the Day of Atonement, when the blood was taken into the Holy of holies!”

Next, the gynecologist said, “On the fifteenth day of the seventh month, the lungs become fully developed. If born before then, the baby would have a hard time breathing.” And Zola thought, “That’s the festival of Tabernacles, a time of celebrating the Temple, home of the Shekinah glory or Spirit of God.” In the New Testament, the Greek term pneuma, normally translated as “breath,” is applied to the “Holy Spirit.”

Birth takes place on the tenth day of the ninth month. Eight days after birth, in Jewish families, a son is circumcised. Zola noted that the eight days of Hanukkah are celebrated right on schedule, nine months and ten days after Passover.

No human being could have understood the gestation period 3,500 years ago. The establishment of the Jewish Holy Days was given to Moses by Jehovah, Himself. Its correlation with the human gestation period is not only remarkable; it proves “Intelligent Design.” It proves the existence of an intelligence beyond this world. It proves that there is a Creator God that guides the affairs of man.

Promoted to the Home Office

On Wednesday, April 19, 2006, Zola Levitt went home to be with the Lord after a battle with lung cancer. The announcement on his website added: “What a soldier’s testimonial — to stay at his post until called away by Yeshua! Happy is the man whose work is his play.”

In giving his testimony, Zola wrote:

“I came to the Lord on March 14, 1971, through the urgings of Campus Crusaders at Indiana University. They challenged me to read the Scriptures, particularly the Book of John. I went by night, like Nicodemus, to the campus director’s home and brought a New Testament bound by itself (what Dr. McCall, our ministry senior theologian refers to as ‘The Amputated Bible’).

“When I read John’s cosmic views of the Lord and the plan of salvation, I realized that I was reading Jewish writing about a Jewish Messiah, and a Jewish way to God. All the Campus Crusaders might have been Gentiles, but I knew Jewish thought when I read it. My prayer of 28 years ago was extremely simple. I said to God, ‘If You’re there, show me.’ An open-minded look at the life I have led since that moment would have to conclude that He has indeed shown me wonders.”

The correlation between the Jewish festivals and the birthing of a baby was just one of those “wonders.”

 

 

 

pagan-christianity

Hebrew Roots of Christian Holidays part 1

Hebrew Roots of Christian Holidays part 2

Hebrew Roots of Christian Holidays – Examine Yourself

Hebrew Roots of Christian Holidays – Pagan Christianity?

Hebrew Roots of Christian Holidays – Alexander Hislop

Hebrew Roots of Christian Holidays – Ralph Woodrow

Hebrew Roots of Christian Holidays – Pagan Parallels

Hebrew Roots of Christian Holidays – Church Fathers & Paganism

Hebrew Roots of Christian Holidays – Constantine

Hebrew Roots of Christian Holidays – Origins of Christian Holidays

Hebrew Roots of Christian Holidays – Easter & Paganism?

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